Archives for posts with tag: Lisa Mason Fantasy and Science Fiction Author

The updated Lisa Mason Website is in place with new covers, new links worldwide for all readers, new photos, and new titles!

Sadly I must tell you, Sony has gone out of business as a publisher. The Sony links are still there since we’re not sure when they’re transitioning to Kobo. And we’ve been having serious problems since March, 2014 getting Barnes and Noble’s system to update our list.

Those of you who own a Nook, the links are good but out of date so please wait until I announce here on WordPress, on Twitter, and on Facebook that the list has been updated.

In the meantime, let’s get started!

My Home Page: A headshot of yours truly with new items and a summary of everything that lies within, with website links. All the links to my website, my blog site, my Author Page on Facebook, my Personal Page on Facebook, my Twitter handle, my profile on LinkedIn, my Author Page on Goodreads, and more. You’ll find the links to the website pages at the bottom of the screen.

My Story, An Author’s Bio: A short, sweet page relating my journey from college to a becoming a fulltime writer. A full-length photo of me, plus a picture of me and my handsome red-haired husband, Tom Robinson with links to his art and jewelry pages.

Books: These are my traditionally published books (so far!), with the Big Publishers’ covers and review quotes. A couple of the books have been completely re-edited and republished as ebooks under the Bast Books imprint.

Stories: My traditionally published stories in magazines and anthologies. Just about everything on this page has been republished separately as an ebook or in an ebook collection.

Summer of Love, A Time Travel: My Great American Novel, with Science Fiction. I put my heart and soul and a lot of research into this book. A Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book. I re-edited the Bantam edition to create a tighter, more focused book for Bast Books. Some of my views have evolved since I first wrote the book. Still my bestselling title. Tom Robinson hand-crafted the spectacular cover.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel: After researching the 1960s, I became fascinated with the 1890s, which in many ways was a similar tumultuous period in American history. Working in this period gave me a whole new voice that significantly expanded my range. A reviewer at the New York Times noticed the book and listed it as a Notable Book of the Year. I was thrilled! When I adapted the Bantam edition as an ebook, I re-edited to make it a tighter, better book.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery): The Alienist was published at about the time of The Gilded Age, took place in the same time period, but was a murder mystery set in New York City, and became a big hit. Also, Diana Gabaldon was writing complex, sexy time travels (in Scotland and a completely different time period), but she was selling well. So I wanted to take all this great 1890s research with suffragist/feminist themes and write a big book with sexy romance, history, and serious social and political issues.

Celestial Girl was submitted by my literary agent at the time to a top editor whom I’d lunched with and wanted to work with. The editor made a “very good offer,” but my lame-brained (now former) agent convinced me I should ask for more. This was the worst decision I’ve ever made in my career. The deal fell apart and I was left with a very long book and no buyer. I was so discouraged and disgusted, I threw the manuscript into a laundry hamper and dropped out of traditional publishing for more years than I care to say.

Tom Robinson convinced me to retrieve the manuscript from the hamper, and here it is, my friends: my six-figure passionate historical romantic suspense. Five-star reader reviews so far.

Celestial Girl (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) Books 1 through 4: The book tops out at 200,000 words. I divided it into four “parts,” which read well as “books.” Bast Books is offering the miniseries in three affordable installments. Books 3 and 4 together are the final installment.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series: After I got over being disgusted and discouraged by traditional publishing, I looked into the trends and discovered urban fantasy, a rich mix of fantasy tropes set in a contemporary often urban setting, with mystery and police procedural, romance, and wit. Yes! At the time I discovered and loved this new genre, ebooks were going strong. I took this new title to Bast Books.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Books 1 through 3: Volume 1 is another longbook at 140,000 words. Bast Books is also offering Volume 1 in three affordable installments. Please note that The Labyrinth of Illusions, Volume 2 of the Abracadabra Series is forthcoming and is an entirely new book.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story: This is a brand-new monograph about writing and inspiration, in childhood and later in my adulthood, and a moving experience I had last year with a little life in my garden. Includes my first science fiction story, “Arachne,” which got published in Omni Magazine, a venue that had a worldwide circulation of five million subscribers.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories: I wanted a story collection for a long time, and here it is. The collection has garnered terrific reviews all over the place, and I’m very proud of it. The stories are not at all what you may think of as “sci fi” or “fantasy,” which is what I’m all about as a writer. One reviewer called me “the female Philip K. Dick.” Nuff said.

Shaken: Starting out as a novelette published in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine as “Deus Ex Machina,” republished in an anthology, Transcendental Tales, and translated and republished in a number of countries, I expanded this piece into a short thriller, “The Net” meets “Conspiracy Theory” with earthquakes. What does sexual attraction amount to? What is the truth? And what are lies? I’d like to see this work get a better readership and understanding of what I was trying to achieve. Includes a list of technical sources.

Tomorrow’s Child: The Story That Sold To The Movies. The concept started out as a medical documentary I wrote for 3M Company, evolved into a lead story in Omni, and sold outright to Universal. My film rights agent said he cried at the end. The ebook includes my thirty-day blog, “The Story Behind The Story That Sold To The Movies.”

Every Mystery Unexplained: I published this novella about stage magic, real magic, and love in the acclaimed anthology David Copperfield’s Tales of the Impossible (HarperPrism). A bunch of big authors published stories there, too, but mine was the only story about stage magic. (Yes, THE David Copperfield.)

Daughter of the Tao: I published this novella about Chinese magic in Peter S. Beagle’s Immortal Unicorn anthology (HarperPrism) along with another bunch of big authors. Lots of unicorns, of course, but mine was the only Chinese unicorn.

Hummers: I published this story about cancer in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. The story was chosen for the prestigious Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror 5th Annual Collection (St. Martin’s Press) and short-listed for the Nebula Award.

The Sixty-Third Anniversary of Hysteria: A story published in the acclaimed anthology, Full Spectrum 5 by Bantam, inspired by the lives of two of my favorite women Surrealist artists, the brilliant and visionary Leonora Carrington and Remedios Varo. Includes a summary of their lives and a list of sources.

Tesla, A Worthy of His Time: A Screenplay: A feature biopic of the great inventor’s tumultuous life—the Man Who Invented the Twentieth Century. Read by the producer of “Aliens” and “The Abyss,” now at another producer.

U F uh-O, A Sci Fi Comedy: “Knocked Up” meets “E.T.”This started out as a screenplay for a producer looking for another “Men in Black” or “Galaxy Quest.” I rewrote the screenplay as a novella, which has gotten five-star reviews. Fun stuff!

Next Thing: Announcements about my forthcoming projects. A bunch of them!

Eon’s Kiss by Suzanna Moore: A passionate paranormal romancewith seriousthemes ofself-empowerment and environmentalism. There’s a Happily Ever After but not quite the way you might think. Suzanna is writing two more Eon books to complete the trilogy.

Bast Books: This is my ebook publisher, who is considering taking some of my titles back into print.

Bast Collectible Books: Tom Robinson is a longtime book collector who has occasionally sold rare books in stores. We have a small collection for sale listed on Amazon, mostly of Beat poetry books, and plan to add more titles. The Andy Warhol sped out the door. Book dealers and collectors welcome.

Five Questions with Castles in the Sky: This is a wonderful, lively site dedicated to promoting authors by a couple of aspiring authors. They ask authors to craft their own “Five Questions” and do a great job splicing in their own graphics. Also, they review books and loved Strange Ladies: 7 Stories.

Lisa Mason’s Interview with Festivale: This is a fun book promotion site that sent me interview questions via Facebook.

Lisa Mason Chats about Writing with Ryan Schneider, 1: I met the dashing Ryan Schneider through Twitter. As an independent author, he has published a dozen titles and is deeply committed to writing and the creative process. His interview questions were thought-provoking.

Lisa Mason Chats about Writing with Ryan Schneider, 2: This is Ryan’s follow-up interview with me. I met the dashing Ryan Schneider through Twitter. As an independent author, he has published a dozen titles and is deeply committed to writing and the creative process.

Lisa Mason Talks Time Travel with Laura Vosika, Blogs 1 through 3: I met Laura through Facebook. She’s got a couple of independently published time travel books taking place in medieval Scotland that have gotten excellent notices. We had great fun discussion time travel issues.

Lisa Mason Talks Time Travel with Laura Vosika, Blogs 4 through 5: I met Laura through Facebook. She’s got a couple of independently published time travel books taking place in medieval Scotland that have gotten excellent notices. We had great fun discussion time travel issues.

Keep Fit, Keep Writing: A Roundtable with Authors Kevin J. Anderson, Lisa Mason, and Linda Nagata (Part 1: Move It!): Kevin has written extensively in the Dune universe, Linda has an independently published book on the Nebula Finalist list. All health enthusiasts, we have some rather different opinions about exercise.

Keep Fit, Keep Writing: A Roundtable with Kevin J. Anderson, Lisa Mason, and Linda Nagata (Part 2: Chow Down!): Kevin has written extensively in the Dune universe, Linda has an independently published book on the Nebula Finalist list. All health enthusiasts, we have some rather different opinions about diet.

The Story of Alana: My beloved Turkish Angora cat rescued from the East Bay SPCA. My favorite pictures of her, plus important information about encouraging cats to drink more water.

The Story of Luna: My beloved blue mink Tonkinese cat also rescued from the East Bay SPCA. My favorite pictures of her.

Art by Tom Robinson: My husband, Tom Robinson, has degrees from the San Francisco Art Institute, the California Academy of Art, and the Revere Academy of Jewelry. He is one of the most talented artists on planet Earth. Here is a small sampling of his art and how to contact him for commissions.

Jewelry by Tom Robinson: My husband, Tom Robinson, has degrees from the San Francisco Art Institute, the California Academy of Art, and the Revere Academy of Jewelry. He is one of the most talented artists on planet Earth. Here is a small sampling of his jewelry, where he has some pieces, and how to contact him for commissions.

Thank you for your readership!

In 2013, the highest earning entertainer, who also is an author, was E. L. James, who earned according to Publisher’s Weekly and other sources, $100 million dollars in worldwide royalties from the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy. Those books were published by Random House as ebooks and trade paperbacks, not even hardcovers, and earned Random House so much money, the publisher gave $ 5,000 Christmas bonuses to every employee, including the mailroom staff.

E. L. James was an unknown amateur writer and, by every account I’ve read, her writing is at best pedestrian and at worst dreadful. Full disclosure: I haven’t read the trilogy but I did check out the first 50 pages of the first book on Amazon’s “Look Inside” feature. Stephen King decried Fifty Shades as porn, and, as you probably know, those books are about the BDSM relationship between a naïve, awkward, unpretty college girl and a devastatingly handsome, cold and calculating twenty-seven-year-old billionaire who seems to have a lot of spare time on his hands.

The “relationship” is set up by a legal contract. I’ve seen articles over the years about pre-nuptial agreements between women of lesser wealth and the billionaires they marry. Such contracts usually stipulate what is required in intimate relations, as well as what happens financially when the “relationship” ends. I even read an article about a well-known billionaire who, in between marriages, had one-year contracts with his girlfriends.

So this type of thing isn’t exactly news, but may have been shocking to those who don’t follow the Media as closely as I do.

It turns out Fifty Shades isn’t even all that racy as porn, according to many reviews.

I, and many other feminists including the mega-bestselling Janet Evanovich, voiced our concerns that such a theme set back women’s empowerment by fifty years. I mean, men go to prison for torturing women. Full disclosure: I personally don’t find BDSM or controlling men attractive at all. But other erotica authors rushed forward to defend the theme, if not the books. Ardent fans variously declared in reader comments that “it’s so bad, but it’s so addictive” or “how far will Ana let Christian go for love?”

Are there really seventy million readers out there who find the fantasy of being a submissive to a sadist enticing? Or who really are submissives? Or who are sadists trying to pick up a few pointers?

What zeitgeist did James tap into? If it’s true the “average reader” reads only one book a year, was that book Fifty Shades? And what does that say about our society?

Fifty Shades spawned a rash of BDSM books, most of which tanked except for Sylvia Day’s Crossfire Trilogy. Day, I should note, is a talented, professional writer of science fiction and fantasy going way back. Her writing is far superior to James’, but she hasn’t sold any seventy million books. After a good run with the Big Five Publisher of Crossfire, she’s continued her brand of porn through Harlequin, a genre publisher.

How does an unknown author with a mediocre style and a questionable theme earn a hundred million dollars inside of a year or two? How did Fifty Shades happen?

The Spin was this: James wrote fan fiction under a kooky pseudonym in the Twilight universe, imagining BDSM sex between Bella and Edward.

Twilight is another trilogy Stephen King has decried as “teen porn,” and has stated outright that “Stephenie Meyer can’t write worth a damn.”

I’m not sure from the Spin if James hosted her own fan fiction site or if she participated on someone else’s site. Whatever the case, how did James dream up such a crazy idea from a YA book?

As a professional author who makes it her business to follow what’s selling, I’ve read Twilight (but not the rest of the series). I find Meyer’s prose not as dreadful as a lot of people think. While I don’t understand another unknown author selling seventy million books inside of four or five years, I get that Meyer tapped into teen angst and the thrills and chills of a first obsessive teen love. But BDSM?

Well, Edward is cold—he’s dead, he’s a vampire. He’s gorgeously handsome, while Bella is plain. But he chooses her.

You would think Stephenie Meyer, a Mormon wife and mom of three who doesn’t drink or smoke, a fan of Jane Austen no less, would have written a nice morality tale about two Mormon teens who fall in love and have to wait until they are of the age of marry to do more than kiss.

But she didn’t. And here, at page 302 of the trade paperback, “His long hands formed manacles around my wrists.” And at 305, “I tried to pull back, but his hand locked my wrists in an unbreakable hold.” And at 345, when Bella tells Edward he’s not such a scary monster, he unexpectedly seizes her and leaps across the room. “He curled me into a ball against his chest, holding me more securely than iron chains.”

Holy Shades of Grey.

At some point James’ fan fiction got noticed by readers of the site. She changed the characters’ names (note that Meyer’s husband’s name is Christian, though she calls him by a nickname) and got picked up by a very small independent Australian publisher, The Writer’s Coffee Shop, which published the books in print as well as ebook format. The Writer’s Coffee Shop really is a very small publisher currently carrying three authors, all of whose books are BDSM and none of whom are much higher than a million-six in Amazon ranking.

No deep pockets there. But they (or someone) did a masterful job of crafting brand-name-looking covers for Fifty Shades. No faces. No half-naked bodies. Just the fetishes—tie, mask, handcuffs—against a gray background. Romance authors, take note.

The Spin then says Fifty Shades got noticed by a site for new mothers called “diva moms.” I remember that, at the beginning of 2013, a feature story about “the new mommy porn” flashed at the top of my AOL Home page. A lot of excitement generated around this hot new book from an unknown fan fiction writer. Suddenly, puff pieces about the book—decrying the writing, drawing analogies to BDSM erotica of yore, especially The Story of O—popped up in all kinds of mainstream media. And suddenly, hundreds of thousands of ebooks sold. A publishing deal was struck with Random House, a five-million-dollar movie deal with Universal Pictures, and voila, seventy million books (print and ebooks, I assume) sold worldwide.

I remember thinking—at some point, Big Money stepped in. You don’t just go from mediocre fan fiction writing on an obscure website, no matter how big the source material, to megamillions. But at what point?

About two or three weeks ago, I received a notice on my Newsfeed on LinkedIn. Here’s the link:

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Jane-unfortunately-money-talks-In-65681.S.5839718902900207620?view=&item=5839718902900207620&type=member&gid=65681&trk=eml-b2_anet_digest-null-5-null&fromEmail=fromEmail&ut=0jYFovonz1oSc1

The post claims that E. L. James invested $100,000 of her own money into promoting 50 Shades of Grey. At some point.

This is unsubstantiated rumor. The woman who posted this item doesn’t cite a source. Of course, the Spin says E. L. James and her husband are television executives in Britain. Or that E. L. James is a middle-aged, stay-at-home mom trying to revitalize her marriage. Or that E. L. James was a new mom spinning fantasies off her favorite book to please herself. Or…..I don’t think we’ll ever know the truth about Fifty Shades.

And neither do the Big Publishers.

So there you have it, my friends. The Shady Case of Fifty Shades. What does this portend for other authors, traditional, hybrid, or independent?

To me, traditional publishing is starting to look a lot like the “indie” movie business. Once upon a time, the Sundance Film Festival featured indies—movies made on a shoestring by talented amateurs hoping to break into the Hollywood Machine. By “shoestring,” I mean maybe ten or twenty thousand dollars raised from credit cards or sympathetic family members (and even that is a lot of money for most people to squander on something that ninety-nine point nine times out of a hundred will never see a return of investment, let alone make money). Now “indie” movies at Sundance cost five million and up to make, feature actors like Nicole Kidman, and vie for distribution from the studios. Does that sound like an “indie” to you?

I don’t think so.

Next: State of the Biz: Publishing in 2014 and Beyond Part 4: The Comet and the Long Tail Lisa Mason #SFWApro

Previous Blogs in this Series:

State of the Biz: Publishing in 2014 and Beyond, Part 1: Introduction Lisa Mason #SFWApro

http://lisamasontheauthor.com/2014/03/18/state-of-the-biz-publishing-in-2014-and-beyond-part-1-introduction-lisa-mason-sfwapro/

State of the Biz: Publishing in 2014 and Beyond Part 2: Who’s Reading? Lisa Mason #SFWApro

http://lisamasontheauthor.com/2014/04/07/state-of-the-biz-publishing-in-2014-and-beyond-part-2-whos-reading-lisa-mason-sfwapro/

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony; Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo; My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters. Thank you for your readership!

Since I know folks on Facebook, on Twitter, and in my real-life neighborhood who have mentioned they read this book, I thought I’d pass along this review (not mine) from Amazon.com of Grain Brain:

Some important information, but lots of holes in this science, September 20, 2013

By Sandy & Richard (Maryland, USA)

This review is from: Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar–Your Brain’s Silent Killers (Kindle Edition)

I applaud Dr. David Perlmutter’s effort to help conquer Alzheimer’s and other neurologic disease, from autism to migraines, through the use of nutrition. Information abounds elsewhere on heart health and cancer nutrition, with little focus on diseases of the brain. Dr. Perlmutter also brings our attention to the potential dangers of taking daily pills and our nearly century-long experiment of abandoning real food for processed food. (Unfortunately, he advocates the use of pills that are supplements, which also should be unnecessary for those who have appropriate nutrition.)

The gist of Dr. Perlmutter’s recommendations is to eliminate sugars, gluten (wheat and barley), and processed foods, and to greatly limit whole carb foods like fruits and whole grains, and also potatoes, beans and lentils. He also advocates eating more fats from nuts, olive and coconut oil, and avocados, but also from beef, butter and cheese.

I compare his book to those of other “popular” doctors who make names for themselves writing books, appearing on TV, and treating prominent personalities, doctors like Caldwell Esselstyn from the Cleveland Clinic, Dean Ornish, Neal Barnard, Susan Blum, and T. Colin Campbell, a nutritional science professor and researcher. It is noteworthy that among them, Dr. Perlmutter is the only neurologist.

Eliminating sugars, refined wheat products and processed foods from the diet is agreed upon by all. Dr. Perlmutter’s assertions about gluten’s adverse effects on the brain are supported by Dr. Blum’s warnings about its association with autoimmune disease. While Dr. Esselstyn, who focuses on heart disease, argues that only small amounts of plant-based fats are required by the body, perhaps he could be convinced to concede a bit on this point, as he seems to have done with regard to people who are not already suffering from heart disease, although the proper amount of fats needed for good health remains in dispute.

But what remains most controversial are Dr. Perlmutter’s contentions that food products derived from animals are healthy, that saturated fats are necessary, that whole carbs are dangerous, and that high total cholesterol and LDLs are healthy. Some of the doctors listed above might concede that a little fish and the occasional egg in the diet may be beneficial (though some would not). One or two of these doctors might sign off on a piece of chicken a couple of times a week. One or two might be okay with limited amounts of dairy products (though Dr. Perlmutter too restricts milk, for reasons he does not explain well).

What I believe is unanimous among the doctors listed above, as well as cardiologists everywhere, if not oncologists, is that the excessive amounts of beef and eggs prescribed by Dr. Perlmutter, the three-times-a-day consumption of animal products, and the elimination of beans, legumes and most whole carbs, are a dangerous prescription for heart health and cancer prevention, if not also for brain health. And therein rest the holes in Dr. Perlmutter’s hypotheses. I list below some obvious ones.

Dr. Perlmutter overemphasizes our need to return to the diet of our hunter-gatherer “caveman” ancestors in order to stave off diseases like Alzheimer’s. Let’s return to the non-packaged diet of our grandparents. But to advocate the “caveman” (i.e., Paleo) diet is naïve. Members of today’s rare remaining hunter-gather societies who survive infant mortality and childhood disease live on average into their early 50′s. [...] While it’s true that our increased life expectancy in the developed world may be nearly entirely attributed to the eradication of infectious disease with antibiotics and vaccines and certain other safety, hygiene, and medical advances, rather than to improvements in our diet, it is also true that “cavemen” did not live long enough to contract Alzheimer’s in their 70′s and 80′s. Returning to a caveman diet may argue well for accepting that human beings were simply designed to only live to their 30′s-50′s and does little to convince those of us who would like to live well into our 90′s.

Dr. Perlmutter points out that our caveman ancestors could eat fruit only when it was in season, not every day of the year (implying that we too should not eat it year round), but says nothing of the fact that in the same geographic locations they also would not have had green vegetables all year round (but does not advise us to abstain from greens, ever). He does not talk about the fact that caveman diets differed in different parts of the world. Some ate more plant foods than animal foods. Those who ate animal foods were not “hunting” primarily for cows but for deer, rabbits, duck, mountain goats, or whatever the locale offered. The Paleo argument borders on absurdity and does not support a diet based on cows.

Dr. Perlmutter points to the increased consumption of grains during the 20th century as a cause for declining health but ignores the exponential increase in the consumption of cheese and beef. [...] Moreover, Dr. Perlmutter ignores the diets of modern societies with extraordinarily long life expectancies. For example, the staple in Okinawa, which enjoys one of the world’s longest life expectancies, is the sweet potato, which Dr. Perlmutter shuns. [...]

The Mediterranean diet of residents in Ikaria, Greece is low in dairy and meat and emphasizes potatoes, beans and legumes. A recent study there revealed residents living 8 to 10 years longer than Americans and suffering only a quarter as much dementia. [...] In the “Comments” section following this review, I have listed a number of other societies as examples, with links to the supporting data. The bottom line is that Dr. Perlmutter’s attack on potatoes, whole grains, beans and legumes is unfounded.

Dr. Perlmutter cites a study (Barberger-Gateau, et al.) that he claims supports the notion that people who don’t consume Omega-3 rich fish have a higher risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s. The study’s actual conclusion was that those who consumed Omega-6 oils without compensating with sufficient Omega-3 oils were at higher risk. In other words, as long as a person doesn’t consume inappropriate Omega-6 rich oils, s/he can be amply healthy without fish.

Dr. Perlmutter’s assertions about cholesterol are contested by much scientific literature in addition to many or all of the doctors listed above. Moreover, Dr. Perlmutter’s opinions are positively confusing for the casual reader. He acknowledges that high oxidized LDL’s are unhealthful but gives no advice on how to determine one’s oxidized LDL’s rather than the LDL levels as presented on common blood test reports. He believes that total cholesterol should be high, but triglycerides shouldn’t be. But nowhere does he give clear guidance on what ideal cholesterol levels would look like. He cites a 1994 article (Location 1230, Kindle) that demonstrates that the risk of heart attack with total cholesterol under 200 was as high as for total cholesterol over 240. In his book on heart disease, Dr. Esselstyn agrees that 200 is not safe but presents evidence instead to support the fact that total cholesterol should be even lower, 150 or less. And while improving diet before resorting to pills would always make good sense, doctors at Columbia University just this year reiterated the opinion that high LDL’s are dangerous, and they continue to believe that statins have saved lives. [...]. The bottom line here is that the public needs a lot more guidance, untainted by the pharmaceutical industry. And Dr. Perlmutter should remember that before people worry about getting Alzheimer’s in their 70′s and 80′s, they must survive their 50′s and 60′s without heart disease and cancer. His discussions on cholesterol may have some validity, but they are are too confusing to be convincing. I found Dr. Esselstyn, who has brought heart patients back from the brink of death, to be a lot more convincing.

Dr. Perlmutter advises to eat grass-grazed beef, free-range chickens and wild-caught fish, ignoring the fact that most people can’t afford these products, and even if they could, the planet could not sustain a sufficient supply of them. Even the relatively affluent would be hard-pressed to be able to eat these products three times a day at home and in restaurants. They’re difficult to find, and he offers no alternatives in his menu plans. It is not clear whether he would favor factory-farmed beef over plant-based proteins like beans, or vice versa, when those are the choices.

Dr. Perlmutter ignores the research by T. Colin Campbell at Cornell University, which showed that the protein casein, found in dairy products including milk and cheese, promotes cancer growth. He also ignores Dr. Campbell’s extensive research in rural China during the 1980′s that revealed that a vegetable-based diet with very little animal products resulted in extremely low levels of heart disease and cancer (and total cholesterol in the 120-150 range, without dementia). A more recent study at Loma Linda University showed that vegetarian and vegan diets were protective against a large number of cancers. [...]. Dr. Neal Barnard’s book Power Foods for the Brain presents ample evidence to support the benefit of a plant-based diet for brain health.

Finally, Dr. Perlmutter’s book does not include sufficient numbers of footnotes, and some of those that he does include reference websites without referencing specific pages, making it all but impossible to find his sources.

In summary, I believe that Dr. Perlmutter offers a lot of useful information, and some good advice. But he concludes his book by saying, “It’s hard to separate truth from fiction, and to know the difference between what’s healthful and harmful…” He’s right about that, and his book fails to end the confusion. I do believe that I learned some useful things from this book and have made slight changes to my diet (which, in my opinion, was already very healthful). But I can’t give the book more than two stars because Dr. Perlmutter’s opinions about eating so many cow and chicken products and saturated fats, and cutting out nearly all whole-food carbs, are too controversial to endorse. It seems that unless and until his theories are better proven, they are too potentially dangerous to follow.

It is noted that wherever you see “[...]” above, I had included links to the supporting documentation for the facts cited. Apparently, Amazon has bleeped out these links. I suggest that if you google the subject matter, you will find the supporting studies.”

So there you have it, my friends. This is not my review, but I urge you to consider it.

On New Year’s Day, 2014, I posted two WordPress blogs that I also posted on the Lisa Mason Official Website: Keep Fit, Keep Writing: A Roundtable with Authors Kevin J. Anderson, Lisa Mason, and Linda Nagata (Part 1: Move It!), discussing exercise,and Keep Fit, Keep Writing: A Roundtable with Kevin J. Anderson, Lisa Mason, and Linda Nagata (Part 2: Chow Down!), discussing diet. Now that you’re done with your taxes, check it out!

Hate spiders? Fear spiders? Let me persuade you to feel otherwise in My Charlotte: Patty’s Story, a short, sweet memoir about a life in a garden and one writer’s first inspiration. Includes my first science fiction story, Arachne, published by Omni Magazine worldwide, by Hayakawa in Japan, and by Replik in Sweden.

Reading Charlotte’s Web, the classic children’s book, inspired me to write my own novels at the age of eight. My quest to discover the meaning of the spider led me to Jungian psychology, myths, and symbols. The classic myth of Arachne became the subtext of my first story, Arachne, published in Omni. My first two early cyberpunk novels followed, Arachne and Cyberweb, published by William Morrow and Avon Books. I am presently working on an adaptation of those books as The Quester Trilogy.

So there you have it, my friends. Plenty about reading, writing, my roots as a writer, my journey and struggle to become a writer, the life-long process of inspiration, and how I broke into the professional market.

And spiders!

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.

If you’re reading on a Kobo, the link to My Charlotte: Patty’s Story should post in a day or so. Check in at all my titles on Kobo.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony; Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters. Thank you for your readership!

New! “Just checked to see if this book was on Kindle. It has been many years since I’ve read it but I remember it as one of my very favorite books. Time to go back and re-read it!!!”

The Bantam classic is back! Summer Of Love, A Time Travel, a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book.

Twenty five-star Amazon reader reviews “This book was so true to life that I felt like I was there. I recommend it to anyone.” “More than a great science-fiction, a great novel as well.” “My favourite SF book of all time, beautiful, cynical and completely involving….Unmissable!”

The year is 1967 and something new is sweeping across America: good vibes, bad vibes, psychedelic music, psychedelic drugs, anti-war protests, racial tension, free love, bikers, dropouts, flower children. An age of innocence, a time of danger. The Summer of Love.

San Francisco is the Summer of Love, where runaway flower children flock to join the hip elite and squares cruise the streets to view the human zoo.

Lost in these strange and wondrous days, teenager Susan Bell, alias Starbright, has run away from the straight suburbs of Cleveland to find her troubled best friend. Her path will cross with Chiron Cat’s Eye in Draco, a strange and beautiful young man who has journeyed farther than she could ever imagine.

With the help of Ruby A. Maverick, a wise and feisty half-black, half-white hip entrepreneur, Susan and Chi discover a love that spans five centuries. But can they save the world from demons threatening to destroy all space and time?

A harrowing coming of age. A friendship ending in tragedy. A terrifying far future. A love spanning five centuries. And a gritty portrait of a unique time in American history.

Summer Of Love, A Time Travel is on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.

Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

What the professional book reviewers have to say:

“Captures the moment perfectly and offers a tantalizing glimpse of its wonderful and terrible consequences.” San Francisco Chronicle

“A fine novel packed with vivid detail, colorful characters, and genuine insight.” Washington Post Book World

“Remarkable. . . .the intellect on display within these psychedelically packaged pages is clear-sighted, witty, and wise.” Locus Magazine

“Mason has an astonishing gift. Her chief characters almost walk off the page. And the story is as significant as anyone could wish. This book will surely be on the prize ballots.” Analog

“A priority purchase.” Library Journal

5 stars Calling All FansAmazon Verified Purchase ‘Summer of Love is an important American literary contribution that may very well have a strong and viable fan base. Where are you? Join us! This novel is loads of fun to read. The majority of the characters are hippies from the 1960s who meet a stranger from the future who’s looking to save his world. This fellow, Chiron, needs to find a troubled adolescent teen named Susan (a.k.a. Starbright) for a very compelling reason. The book has a great deal to offer: swift action, lovable characters, spiritual insight, and well-chosen primary documents such as essays, poems, and news articles which round out the reader’s understanding of the worldview of the novel. I think Summer of Love has excellent potential for a wider audience. I hope it continues to enjoy a healthy amount of sales in the used books market on this site. I wish even more for it to be in wider circulation. Some books talk about the sixties. This novel IS the sixties, thanks to the spirit and scholarship of its author. And, as one reader aptly put it, ‘the sci-fi stuff is just plain off the hook.’ Get a copy. Most people who have read it seem to respect it and enjoy it every bit as much as I do.’

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony; Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters. Thank you for your readership!

Hello, hello, is anyone out there reading? Reading fiction for pleasure?

One of my longtime fans, an avid reader, told me neither of his kids read for pleasure. “They’re nineties kids,” he said. Meaning they watch the boob tube, play video games, cruise the Internet, listen to music. Their cultural pleasure is defined by their senses, by their eyes and ears. Not their minds.

I could summon no rebuttal or plea, and I was troubled. People who don’t read, who don’t use their minds, who don’t think and analyze—which is what reading, including fiction reading, encourages—can be so easily manipulated by the sensations of Big Media.

But the good news is, yes, plenty of people are reading. Children became acclimated to reading fiction for pleasure by the phenomenal success of the Harry Potter books. Young adults have learned to read for pleasure from Twilight and other YA books and, whatever you think of the quality of those books, if they encourage people to read, they’ve done a good thing.

We’re talking a multi-billion-dollar business. The fact that the Big Five Publishers continue to maintain posh editorial offices in fancy Manhattan skyscrapers (been there, seen them) is proof that the getting is still good.

For the Big Five Publishers. And for some authors.

Here’s what Publishers Weekly had to say about last year:

A Strong Finish for Trade, Even with eBook Decline, As Every Other Major Publishing Segment Rises In 2013

Trade publishing finished 2013 with two strong months of sales, according to the publishers who report to the AAP, closing the gap to put full-year trade sales a little shy of the big 2012 results. Measured sales from the approximately 1,200 reporting publishers were $6.441 billion for 2013, down by $74 million (or 1 percent) from 2012 — which was a banner year, thanks to the Hunger Games and Fifty Shades trilogies. (By comparison, total AAP trade sales in 2011 were $6.082 billion, when Borders went bankrupt and liquidated.)

November sales of $651 million were up strongly, by $62 million (or 10.5 percent) compared to a year ago, with December sales of $530 million up 2 percent (or $12 million) over 2012. Adult sales showed the largest gains in November, while children’s and YA sales led the December increase.

The other headline for 2013 is that overall trade ebook sales declined — slightly — for the first time since the AAP has tracked such sales. Total publisher ebook sales for 2013 were $1.471 billion, down by $15 million, from 2012. All of the decline and then some came from children’s and YA ebooks, since the late-in-the-year rise of Veronica Roth’s Divergent books was not big enough to overcome the falloff from the success of Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games in 2012. Children’s ebooks comprised $170.5 million in 2013, compared to $232.5 million in 2012. Adult ebooks rose modestly, at $1.301 billion up 4 percent (or $48 million) from 2012.

What do you notice about this news?

Billions of dollars and brand-name successes you can count on the fingers of one hand. (I’ll get to the ebooks issue a little later.)

Brand-name fiction successes that literally drive the profits up or down of massive multinational corporations. The rest of those profits flow from business books, technical books, religious books, diet books, self-help books, some celebrity books. Those books don’t interest me and I’m not qualified to comment on them.

That said, what is a brand-name fiction success? Where does it come from? How does an author make this happen?

I’ll analyze the first of the two trilogies Publishers Weekly mentioned.

Suzanne Collins wrote some baby TV scripts for Nickolodeon and some baby books. She was well connected to East Coast Big Media. By her own account, she watched a Japanese TV show very similar to what she produced in The Hunger Games. She has an interesting background as the daughter of a high-ranking military officer in the U.S. Army. Scholastic, the publisher of Harry Potter in the U.S., picked up her book, got a great Stephen King blurb for the cover, and published 500,000 books. I’m not sure if that was the first print run, but that’s what got printed before THG hit gigantically big, thanks to a relentless publicity campaign on Amazon and elsewhere.

I’ve reviewed The Hunger Games on Goodreads, I thought it was a mediocre, weird science fiction book, kind of rambling and obsessed with food and clothes, and not at all the “non-stop speed rap” Stephen King claimed it was.

But The Hunger Games hit with the young adult audience, for reasons no one completely understands, and equally mediocre and nonsensical movies have been made, and Suzanne Collins has earned $50 million dollars. Since then, Collins has written a small children’s book about war that pretty much sank like a stone.

So that’s a conventional Traditional Publishing Phenom: a project that went through all the right channels and emerged—to everyone’s surprise—into a blockbuster.

But what about Fifty Shades of Grey? This trilogy has been such a puzzling Phenom, I’m not sure anyone understands it at all.

So there you have it, my friends. Traditional publishing has never been easy and looks to be getting worse than ever. What about all the other books? What about all the other authors?

What about your book? What about you, as an author? If you’re serious about writing fiction, is there any hope?

Yes, there is. But that hope comes with a lot of caveats.

Next: The Fifty Shades of Grey Phenom.

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords. The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony; Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony. Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo; My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters. Thank you for your readership!

Happy Patty’s Day!

The Apple Link Is In!

I can’t think of a better reason to indulge in an Irish coffee, a delightful concoction invented in 1895 by the Buena Vista Café at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco. Made of coffee, Irish whiskey, and whipped cream, the drink satisfies what the late, great Herb Caen called “the four basic food groups: caffeine, alcohol, sugar, and fat.”

This is also the day when I discovered a large orb weaver in my garden. Hate spiders? Fear spiders? Let me persuade you to feel otherwise in My Charlotte: Patty’s Story, a short, sweet memoir about a life in a garden and one writer’s first inspiration. Includes my first science fiction story, Arachne, published by Omni Magazine worldwide, by Hayakawa in Japan, and by Replik in Sweden.

Reading Charlotte’s Web, the classic children’s book, inspired me to write my own novels at the age of eight. My quest to discover the meaning of the spider led me to Jungian psychology, myths, and symbols. The classic myth of Arachne became the subtext of my first story, Arachne, published in Omni, a magazine with a circulation of five million at the time. My first two early cyberpunk novels followed, Arachne and Cyberweb, published by William Morrow and Avon Books. I am presently working on an adaptation of those books as The Quester Trilogy.

So there you have it, my friends. There’s plenty about reading, writing, my roots as a writer, my journey and struggle to become a writer, the life-long process of inspiration, and how I broke into the professional market.

And spiders!

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is $.99 until March 22 on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.

If you’re reading on a Kobo, the link to My Charlotte: Patty’s Story should post in a day or so. Check in at all my titles on Kobo.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony;
Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a  title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters.
Thank you for your readership!

In 2013, I posted four essays, Crunching the Publishing Numbers. Here are the links:

Part 1, Crunching the Publishing Numbers
http://lisamasontheauthor.com/2013/02/24/crunching-the-publishing-numbers/

Part 2, Crunching the Publishing Numbers. Money and Power
http://lisamasontheauthor.com/2013/05/01/crunching-the-publishing-numbers-part-2-money-and-power/

Part 3, Crunching the Publishing Numbers. Wired and Wool
http://lisamasontheauthor.com/2013/05/05/crunching-the-publishing-numbers-part-3-wool-and-wired/

Part 4, Crunching the Publishing Numbers. Romance Scams
http://lisamasontheauthor.com/2013/08/04/crunching-the-ebook-publishing-numbers-sfwapro/

These essays compare the financials of traditional Big Publishers with the financials of self-publishing an ebook. I don’t mean to denigrate the value of an author’s exposure in the Big Media when you publish through a Big Publisher. Such exposure is very valuable and difficult to match for a self-published author.

That said, the rest of the financials of traditional Big Publishing don’t compare well with self-publishing numbers. And whether you, the author, will get any exposure of your book in the Big Media is totally up to your Publisher. You have no control. Further, if the Publisher doesn’t give you media exposure and marketing support—which is the case for ninety percent of authors—the publisher will still expect you, the author, to promote your book on your own via social networks. So you’ll be promoting the publisher’s 85% interest in your work at your own time and expense and no time and expense to them.

Due to the difficulty authors have these days retaining a recognized literary agent, all the Big Publishers (and several small independent publishers) offer imprints to which you may submit your book without an agent. They typically offer only an ebook, with some publishing a mass market paperback if your ebook numbers justify the expense. The jury is in: these are mostly scams and exploitative of authors. See above, Part 4, Crunching the Publishing Numbers, Romance Scams.

Now that we’re three months into 2014, a number of pundits—including Smashwords and Writer’s Digest Magazine—have posted their analyses of where the Publishing Business is now and likely to go in the future. I’m not a psychic, but I’m following the blogs and have my own experience. In the next few weeks, I’ll share what I’ve learned with you regarding book earnings, market share, competition, ebooks versus print books, professionalism, and hybrid publishing.

So there you have it, my friends. The Publishing Biz has become a lot like space exploration. Since Big Government can’t or won’t fund space projects, a number of dedicated independent entrepreneurs have stepped up to the challenge and are privately developing rockets, satellites, and space exploration projects like asteroid mining. All space projects need is expertise, passion, inventiveness, imagination, talent, time, and, yes, money. Like writing and publishing.

T minus five, four, three, two, one, Liftoff!

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony;
Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo;
My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a  title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters.
Thank you for your readership!

Happy Spring Reading!

Bast Books Proudly Presents

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story, a short, sweet memoir about a life in a garden and one writer’s first inspiration. The ebook includes my first story, Arachne, which was published by Omni, a magazine with a worldwide circulation of five million.

Reading Charlotte’s Web, the classic children’s book, inspired me to write my own novels at the age of eight. My quest to discover the meaning of the spider led me to Jungian psychology, myths, and symbols. The classic myth of Arachne became the subtext of my first story, Arachne, published in Omni. My first two early cyberpunk novels followed, Arachne and Cyberweb, published by William Morrow and Avon Books. I am presently working on an adaptation of those books as The Quester Trilogy.

So there you have it, my friends. Plenty about reading, writing, my roots as a writer, my journey and struggle to become a writer, the life-long process of inspiration, and how I broke into the professional market.

And spiders!

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is $.99 until March 22 on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.

If you’re reading on an Apple device or a Kobo, the links to My Charlotte: Patty’s Story should post in a day or so. Check in at my titles on Apple and Kobo.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and Mexico.

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony;
Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a  title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters.
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An intriguing, complex mystery grounded in extensive research into controversial 1890s immigration policy blended with passionate romance and a dash of wit.

Lily is not quite a typical woman in Toledo, Ohio, 1896. She may be repressed and dependent on her husband, but she supports the vote for women and has a mind of her own. When Johnny Pentland is found dead at a notorious brothel, Lily discovers her husband is not the man she thought he was.

Pursued by Pentland’s enemies, Lily embarks on a journey that will take her across the country to San Francisco and across the ocean to Imperial China as she unravels a web of murder and corruption reaching from the opium dens of Chinatown to the mansions of Nob Hill.

Her journey becomes one of the heart when she crosses paths with Jackson Tremaine, a debonair, worldly-wise physician. Lily and Jackson begin a conflicted, passionate relationship as they encounter the mysterious Celestial Girl and her dangerous entourage.

5 Stars “I really enjoyed the story and would love to read a sequel! I enjoy living in the 21st century, but this book made me want to visit the Victorian era. The characters were brought to life, a delight to read about. The tasteful sex scenes were very racy….Good Job!”

—Reader Review

Read the whole four-book miniseries at Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery). On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony;
Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

From the author of Summer Of Love, A Time Travel (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Summer of Love, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, Sony, and Smashwords.
The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony;
Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and Sony.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry, worldwide Amazon.com links for Brazil, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, and Spain, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, at Sony, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you enjoy a  title, please “Like” it, add five stars, write a review on the site where you bought it, Tweet it, blog it, post it,, and share the word with your family and friends.

Your participation really matters.
Thank you for your readership!

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