We’ll start off with Tangent at http://www.tangentonline.com/print–bi-monthly-reviewsmenu-260/221-fantasy-a-science-fiction/2932-fantasy-a-science-fiction-novemberdecember-2015
Here’s the review of my story by Robert Turner, a professor at the University of South Dakota.
Tomorrow is a Lovely Day” by Lisa Mason is a clever take on time looping. The protagonist, Benjamin, is stuck in an infinite loop created in an attempt to stave off the end of the world. The writing is tight and Mason’s use of classical allusions adds depth to the tale. The conclusion is satisfying and points the reader towards a consideration of the nature of time and the various cycles of life that it encompasses.”

Next up, is Steve Fahnstalk’s review in Amazing Stories: http://amazingstoriesmag.com/2015/10/magazine-review-magazine-fantasy-science-fiction-novdec-2015/
“Over the next sixty-six years F&SF (as we have called it for years) had a number of editors: Boucher & McComas did it for about 5 years, then Boucher went it alone for another five. Robert P. Mills took over for another five years, and Avram Davidson did it for about three years. Joseph W. Ferman took over for Avram for a couple of years—at least officially on the masthead—it’s said that his son, Edward L. Ferman, actually did the editing. Then Ed Ferman edited it from 1966 to 1991! Kristine Kathryn Rusch edited it from 1991 to 1997, only to be followed by Gordon Van Gelder, who brought C.C. Finlay on as co-editor for part of 2014; now in 2015, C.C. Finlay is sole editor, with Gordon Van Gelder as publisher. (The part of publisher was often, though not always, played also by the editor in many of the preceding years.) Although the frequency of publishing has also varied (as of now it’s bimonthly), F&SF has been a constant presence on the professional SF/F scene—and we hope it can continue for a long time! (Of course, we have to say that we are looking forward to the day when Amazing Stories will return to the newsstand where it belongs!)
Which brings us to the current issue: although dated November/December 2015, it’s out on the newsstands now, with a cover by David A. Hardy, which utilizes his little green alien that has graced a number of F&SF covers. Hardy is a Fellow and founding member of the IAAA (the International Association of Astronomical Artists), and his covers show his amazing grasp of astronomical art. (I mention the IAAA, because another founding member, Rick Sternbach—he of Star Trek The Next Generation fame as well—was our Art GOH at VCON 40 this past weekend. And a splendid time was had by all.)
On to the stories in the current issue.
I started reading in at the end, with Lisa Mason’s sparkling short, “Tomorrow is a Lovely Day,” which combines FTL messaging, time repeats (like Groundhog Day), Nostradamus, the world (as usual) falling apart and other familiar items into a well-written mélange that just might be about the end of the world as we know it. (Or maybe not….)”

Steve’s excellent take on the rest of the stories follows but I’m not going to set his words out here. Click on his link for the inestimable Fahnstalk’s words. Steve concludes:
“So there you go; after all these years, F&SF is still right up there with your “must-read” fiction, in my opinion. Give it a shot—if your local newsstand doesn’t carry it (and there are fewer and fewer outlets for actual magazines), then you can subscribe online here or buy it through Amazon.com.”

And third, we’ve got Locus Magazine, the Trade Journal of the Science Fiction Field with a review of “Tomorrow Is A Lovely Day” by Lois Tilton:

“Time paradoxes. Benjamin is reliving the worst day of his life over and over, except that, somehow, the repetition sets in and makes it worse, every time.
If only tomorrow comes, everything will be better. He’ll get his master’s degree, get a good job teaching, start a family with his wife Molly. Instead, he’s stuck in a low-level job guarding Dr. Schroeder’s time machine, reset every time.
A nightmarish scenario. Nicely done… with an increasingly mad scientist at the core. . . it strikes the same note as the Scholz story, Dr Schroeder partying with all the world leaders, adjusting time to benefit the privileged class, while the rest of the world, including Benjamin, suffers the consequences.”
http://www.locusmag.com/Reviews/

So there you have it, my friends. The critics “got it.” You think?

11.2.15.F&SF.NOV-DEC

Check out the F&SF blog: https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/blog/2015/11/02/editors-note-for-novdec-2015/
F&SF on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fandsf/status/661224980844122112

F&SF on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/6029587257/photos/a.416240307257.190583.6029587257/10153715363957258/

Buy the November-December F&SF here:

Electronic copy (UK): http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004ZFZ4O8/

From the author of Summer Of Love (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist and San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book) on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.
Summer of Love
is also on Amazon.com in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords.

The Gilded Age, A Time Travel is also on Amazon.com in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Mexico, Netherlands, Brazil, Japan, and India.

The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is on BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords.
The Garden of Abracadabra, Volume 1 of the Abracadabra Series, is also on Amazon.com in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Strange Ladies: 7 Stories on Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is also on Amazon.com in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery) includes all four books. On Nook, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo;
Celestial Girl, The Omnibus Edition (A Lily Modjeska Mystery)
is also on Amazon.com in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Spain, Brazil, Japan, and India.

My Charlotte: Patty’s Story on Barnes and Noble, US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo;
My Charlotte: Patty’s Story is also on Amazon.com worldwide in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, Netherlands, and Mexico.

Visit me at Lisa Mason’s Official Website for books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, and blogs, adorable pet pictures, forthcoming projects, fine art and bespoke jewelry by Tom Robinson, worldwide Amazon.com links, and more!

And on Lisa Mason’s Blog, on my Facebook Author Page, on my Facebook Profile Page, on Amazon, on Goodreads, on LinkedIn, on Twitter at @lisaSmason, on Wikipedia, at Smashwords, at Apple, at Kobo, and at Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

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