Archives for posts with tag: Lisa Mason Book Critic

9-16-16-athena-in-sun-2

Getting ready to bake Athena’s ground turkey thigh. Thigh has more fat than turkey breast and cats, as obligate carnivores, need even more fat in their diets than dogs. Three-quarters of a pound lasts her, sealed up the Japanese clear container at left, five or six days.
To serve: I put a couple of chunks in one of her little Japanese crackle bowls, at upper left, then a couple of chucks of canned Whole Paws Turkey & Giblets. The latter has no corn, soy, wheat, rice, meat byproducts, blood meal, or preservatives. Plus real turkey, chicken hearts, chicken livers, peas, carrots, and all the vitamins and minerals cats need. Plus taurine.
Decades ago pet food companies discovered that cats require taurine, a substance found in muscles, nerve tissue, and bile. In the wild, cats eat a whole prey creature. The whole thing, especially the organ meat.
(Grotesque alert: A teenage boy, an athlete, was found dead behind a high school in Boulder, Colorado. At first the police were puzzled. His eyes, heart and liver had been neatly removed, almost surgically removed. Then they realized it was the work of a hungry mountain lion. Human eyes apparently have a lot of fat, too. End grotesque alert)
When I was researching cat nutrition four years ago when we adopted Athena, I found a company that will send you a whole frozen rabbit. You’re supposed to put the rabbit in a food processor (presumably a food processor dedicated to this sole purpose) and grind it up. Then spoon into containers and refrigerate.
No thanks. I’m THAT fanatic about preparing cat food.
Note: I don’t feed Athena kibbles. Like the little predator she is, she eats her antelope-kill substitute at night and digests all day. She doesn’t need to snack all day. Also, kibbles have grain—brown rice, which is supposed to make you think they’re healthy. Nope. Athena had a UTI when she first came to live here four years ago. I took the kibbles away back then. Also, from everything I’ve read, it’s not true that kibbles help clean the cat’s teeth. They don’t.
Invest in a dental sponge and brush your cat’s teeth with dental fluid at least once a week.
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The September 2019 Movie Review
“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
This film was justifiably nominated for the Oscar in several categories and won the Golden Globe. Melissa McCarthy, in a heartfelt and acerbic performance, plays Lee Isreal, a one-time best-selling biographer down on her luck who stumbles on how to earn income to keep her New York City apartment and treat her beloved sick cat after she loses her job. (BTW, I’ve seen the NYC apartments of successful employed people; in the film, Isreal has a nice apartment.)
But story starts out following her humiliation, all too real, as a failed writer.
She goes to a posh party held at her literary agent’s very fancy apartment, overhears a successful author pontificating to a crowd of admirers, helps herself to the deluxe food, and steals a coat from the cloakroom.
Later, she goes to the agent’s very fancy office and pleads for a $10,000 spec sale of a new biography she’s researching. She says in a strangled voice, “I mean, I was on the New York Times Bestseller list once. Doesn’t that count for something?”
The literary agent replies, “I can’t get ten dollars for you.”
Ouch. Meanwhile, she owes the veterinarian money, so he won’t see her sick cat, let alone prescribe needed medicine.
Melissa McCarthy isn’t afraid of appearing fat and ugly. And desperate.
For the rest of The September Review of “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”, join Tier One of my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=23011206.
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The September 2019 Recipe
Lisa Mason’s Spicy California Rice
This is another recipe particularly satisfying for dinner on a chilly winter night, but the dish is good anytime of the year when you want to serve you and your family a nutritious dish with a Mexican flair. I used to call the dish “Mexican Rice,” but Mexican-inspired dishes have, I think, evolved into California cuisine. At our excellent local Mexican restaurant, for example, the menu makes a point that they don’t use lard—long a staple of Mexican cooking. And our veggie-centric dishes would be a novelty in traditional Mexican cuisine, which depends heavily on meat and corn tortillas.
By the way, as always, you can add a tablespoon more of olive oil to the recipe, if you want added fat (fat enhances taste, as all cooks know), or add ground turkey or even ground beef—already cooked, please—if you want meat.
But why would you want to?
In her landmark 1973 book, Diet for a Small Planet, Frances Moore Lappé presents a meticulous argument that meat doesn’t actually contain as much “usable protein” or “complete protein” as people suppose and that bean, vegetable and grain (and sometimes dairy) combinations do the job equally well. Your body does need protein (less protein as you grow older) and usable protein is what your body can metabolize to fuel you.
Think of the classic peanut butter on bread (I hope you’ll transition to whole wheat bread and skip the sugary jelly). The reason this simple meal is satisfying and nourishing is that peanuts and wheat form a complete protein. Eat your sandwich with milk (fat-free milk, if you don’t have a lactose intolerance) and you’re good to go.
Brown rice and beans (kidney, pinto, or black beans) in particular provide a complete protein which is just as good as meat without the bad saturated fat and with the good fiber and vitamins.
I was a teenager when Lappé’s book was published but I quickly discovered it when I went off to college and got out of my mother’s meat-centric kitchen. There weren’t a lot of good vegetarian options then—except cheese and whole wheat bread—and I was skeptical of, and didn’t know how to cook, beans. Like a lot of people who have long eaten meat and haven’t transitioned to beans, legumes at first can cause digestive distress. Trust me, when you ease the meat out of your diet and eat more beans, your system will adjust and you can eat beans freely without embarrassing social consequences (you know what I mean).
On that happy note, let’s begin with Lisa Mason’s Spicy California Rice.
For the rest of the September recipe, join Tier One of my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=23011206.
Note: I’ve grouped multiple posts on each Tier as a single post so that constitutes “one creation” under Patreon rules.
Donate from your PayPal account to lisasmason@aol.com.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
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7.9.19.YOSHIO.VASE_NEW

“Yoshio Kobayashi (1951-2019)
Translator, editor, and fan Yoshio Kobayashi, 68, died June 13, 2019 of an ischemic heart attack. Under his pen name Takashi Ogawa he was one of the leading SF translators in Japan, tirelessly promoting SF and bringing works by Greg Bear, Bruce Sterling, Lucius Shepherd, Lewis Shiner, Michael Swanwick, and other major writers to the Japanese audience. He translated for Japanese publishers including Shueisha and Hayakawa, and for the magazine Hayakawa SF. He taught translation for many years in Tokyo and Sapporo, inspiring generations to share his passion, and founded award-winning Japanese fanzine Palantir in 1981.
Kobayashi was also the longtime Japanese agent for Locus, and a devoted friend to the magazine. Born 1951 in Tokyo, he suffered from neurological problems last year, and while he underwent brain surgery in November, his health continued to decline this year. He is survived by wife Mika Kobayashi and their daughter.”
Locus Magazine, The Magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Field
* * *
I hope you’ll notice in the above official obituary that Locus Magazine neglected to mention the many women SFF writers whose work Yoshio also translated. Including me.
I first met Yoshio in 1991, after my first novel ARACHNE sold to Hayakawa and my Asimov stories, “The Oniomancer” and “Guardian” sold to the magazine Hayakawa SF.
He was a pleasant-looking, diminutive Japanese man with genuine warmth, congeniality, and humor. I think Locus Magazine sent him over to my home since Yoshio was an agent for the magazine, visited Charles Brown (the founder of the magazine) often and Charles had gotten news of my sales to the Japanese market.
Yoshio walked into my home, looking curiously around as he always did and carrying a large box made of bamboo.
This he presented to me. I opened the box and found the gorgeous Japanese vase you see above.
Then we sat down at my dining room table and went over the translation questions he had for me. Yoshio loved American slang, especially surfer slang and 1960s hip slang, and earnestly wanted to translate these strange words and their strange meanings into Japanese.
The next time I saw Yoshio, he was doing business at Locus Magazine in the Oakland Hills. Charles Brown called me: Could I drive him and Yoshio on a tour of the hills and then to dinner?
Of course I could.
Tom sat in the passenger seat, Yoshio and Charles sat in the back and we drove up Summit Drive where you can see the whole spectacular panorama of San Francisco Bay, East Bay, San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Marin Headlands, and out to the Pacific Ocean. Charles said, “I have been everywhere in the world, but I still come back to the Bay Area and am amazed.”
Then I drove everybody across the San Rafael Bridge to Larkspur Landing in Marin County where we dined at the Marin Brewing Company. I don’t know if the restaurant is still there, but it was a burgers and fries and onion rings kind of place, with an impressive display of the brass beer brewing machinery in the front.
I didn’t like to touch my food with my fingers (still don’t), so I ate my burger and onion rings with a knife and fork. Yoshio observed me doing that, and emulated me. Charles’ memorable quote? “I know how to make onion rings, but if someone else cooks them, I’ll spare myself the work.” A good time was had by all, including Yoshio and me cutting up our burgers and buns with a knife and fork.
The next time I saw Yoshio, he was back in the Bay Area and asking if I could pick up he and a couple of friends and drive them up to the Locus house for a meeting.
Of course I could.
For the rest of the Tribute to Yoshio and all of the posts in the September Tier One creation, join Tier One of my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=23011206.
Donate from your PayPal account to lisasmason@aol.com.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
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10.18.17.TGOA.BOOKS

At her mother’s urgent deathbed plea, Abby Teller enrolls at the Berkeley College of Magical Arts and Crafts to learn Real Magic. To support herself through school, she signs on as the superintendent of the Garden of Abracadabra, a mysterious, magical apartment building on campus.
She discovers that her tenants are witches, shapeshifters, vampires, and wizards and that each apartment is a fairyland or hell.
On her first day in Berkeley, she stumbles upon a supernatural multiple murder scene. One of the victims is a man she picked up hitchhiking the day before.
Torn between three men—Daniel Stern, her ex-fiance who wants her back, Jack Kovac, an enigmatic FBI agent, and Prince Lastor, a seductive supernatural entity who lives in the penthouse and may be a suspect—Abby will question what she really wants and needs from a life partner.
Compelled into a dangerous murder investigation, Abby will discover the first secrets of an ancient and ongoing war between Humanity and Demonic Realms, uncover mysteries of her own troubled past, and learn that the lessons of Real Magic may spell the difference between her own life or death.
The Garden of Abracadabra is an ebook on BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords.
On Kindle in the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Australia, and India.
The Garden of Abracadabra is in Print in the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, Italy, and Japan.
“So refreshing. . . .This is Stephanie Plum in the world of Harry Potter.”
Goodreads: “I loved the writing style and am hungry for more!”
Amazon.com: “Fun and enjoyable urban fantasy”

“This is a very entertaining novel—sort of a down-to-earth Harry Potter with a modern adult woman in the lead. Even as Abby has to deal with mundane concerns like college and running the apartment complex she works at, she is surrounded by supernatural elements and mysteries that she is more than capable of taking on. Although this book is just the first in a series, it ties up the first “episode” while still leaving some story threads for upcoming books. I’m looking forward to finding out more.”
So there you have it, my friends! I’m delighted to announce The Garden of Abracadabra is in print and an ebook worldwide.
Join my other patrons on my Patreon page and learn the shocking reason I’ve opted for Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=23011206
Donate in my time of need from your PayPal account to lisasmason@aol.com.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
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I’m putting the finishing touches on my Patreon Tiers, which I’ll be blogging on WordPress as the autumnal days progress.
Tier One features a Tribute to Yoshio Kobayashi, the beloved Japanese translator of science fiction and fantasy who suddenly and tragically died in May, 2019. I considered him a friend. Tier One also features my original vegetarian recipe for Spicy California Rice and the September movie review, which will probably be a critique of “Can You Ever Forgive Me”? Plus, I’m adding The September Lifestyle Blog to Tier One.
On Tier Two, you’ll find another delightful Lisa Mason story. This one, “Crawl Space”, is an Abracadabra spin-off, with a Foreword introducing the story and an Afterword exploring the extensive research that went into writing a 4,000 word story. Plus, I’m adding The Writing Tip of the Month, analyzing inadvertent repetitions in a manuscript and how you can fix them. You could pay one of the how-to-write venues $4,000 to learn this stuff (and you can pay ME $4,000 if you like), but Tier Two will cost you a mere four bucks.
Your pledge at Tier Three gives you access to all of this material in One and Two, plus the on-going serialization of my acclaimed new novel CHROME. I’ll be adding Chromian blogs about the inspiration, research, and literary backdrop to this Tier.
Finally, your pledge at Tier Four will give you all of the above (at your leisure), plus my on-going memoir Sticks & Stones Will Break My Bones, about the violent criminal Attack against me. The aftermath of the Attack is why I need your help and support at Patreon.
Join my other patrons on my Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=23011206.
Donate from your PayPal account to lisasmason@aol.com.
Check out my books and ebooks, which are being updated for 2019.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
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10.29.15.GILDEDAGEBIG

New Review of The Gilded Age at http://sfbookreview.blogspot.com/2017/12/the-gilded-age-by-lisa-mason.html:
“The world of 2495 is at an unsustainable twelve billion population. Zhu Wong is a Daughter of Compassion, a group working to enforce the birth restriction laws. She is in jail awaiting trial when she is recruited by the Luxon Institute for Superluminal Applications (LISA, I love the acronym) to t-port back to 1895 San Francisco. She accepts the deal. Her mission is to find Wing Sing, take her and the aurelia to the mission run by Donaldina Cameron. In 1967 Wing Sing’s daughter will eventually give the brooch to Chiron at the end of his stay in the Summer of Love project.
Zhu finds Wing Sing, but she doesn’t have the aurelia. They are captured by a Chinese gang. Zhu is bought away from them by Jessie, a madam, Wing Sing stuck with the Tong. Zhu does work for Jessie, but is more valuable as a bookkeeper so avoids becoming a prostitute. Daniel Watkins is the son of a real estate magnate coming to San Francisco to collect on debts. He is low on funds and is referred to lodging at Jessie’s where his life becomes entwined with Zhu’s. Somehow Zhu is attracted to this heavy drinking smoker who has distinct views of women. Despite herself and her mission, Zhu cares about Jessie and Daniel.
I loved the character of Zhu. Somehow I wasn’t repulsed by Daniel and Jessie. They are more a product of their environment doing what they can with their sense of right and wrong. Very enjoyable, I read the last two hundred pages straight through. This is definitely a stand alone novel, though Summer of Love is mentioned several times. I’ll have to read that one as a prequel rather than book one.”
And this is from Library Journal:
“The discovery of a golden brooch that should not exist in the 25th century prompts the Luxon Institute to send a young Chinese woman 600 years back in time. She arrives in San Francisco in 1895 to prevent the future from altering the past. This sequel to Summer of Love (LJ 6/15/94), seen through the eyes of an observer from the future, juxtaposes the tempestuous, sprawling milieu of boomtown San Francisco with its shadowy underside of prostitution and decadence. Mason’s graceful prose and her skill in orchestrating a complex and satisfying plot make this a solid purchase for sf collections.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
This is from a reader:
https://www.amazon.ca/Golden-Nineties-Lisa-Mason/dp/0553373315
5.0 out of 5 stars Hypnotic Read
By,Robin Booneon Published on Amazon.com|Verified Purchase
“Lisa Mason’s Summer of Love and The Golden Nineties both have this quality – you want to reread them as soon as you’ve read them. Her writing conveys an abiding love of San Francisco, and interesting bits of California history are woven into the storylines. The writing is so compelling that you feel as though time travel were a possibility. I hope she writes more of these San Francisco fantasies!”
And this is from Publisher’s Weekly
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-553-37331-8
“Mason’s sequel to Summer of Love is a delightful expansion of that work and a major step forward for her. The tale centers on Zhu Wong, a Chinese national whose lawyer plea-bargains her release from prison so that Chiron and his companions from the previous novel’s Luxon Institute for Superluminal Applications can transport her 600 years into the past to find a macguffin called the aurelia. Once in San Francisco, 1895, Mason brings the environment and the times to life with her rendering of the city’s activities, especially its corruption. The several historic personages who appear–including Frank Norris, Jack London and Susan B. Anthony–are all given dimensions that reflect the rigor of Mason’s research without leaving the reader overburdened by minutiae. Zhu Wong finds herself embroiled in a world of decadence and prostitution; she sees friends and companions abuse themselves with such things as alcohol, cocaine and corsets. As with Karen Joy Fowler’s Sarah Canary, Mason uses the novel partially to explore the role of women in society. As Zhu grows to understand the hypocrisies of the 1890s, she becomes even less comfortable with the presumptions of her own time. She creates several “closed time loops,” apparent paradoxes that impede her mission–and, perhaps more important, thwart her own desires. Eventually she finds her way out of the time loops and in the process teaches everyone–including herself–a few lessons about life. Her bravura performance with this book should both leave the reader wanting more and solidify her position as one of the most interesting writers in science fiction.
And this just in from an Amazon.com reader
Buy It
By Uke Enthusiast
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
“One of my favorite books. I am delighted it is back in print. A thoroughly entertaining time travel story supported by vivid characterizations and settings.”
Book Description: The year is 1895 and immigrants the world over are flocking to California on the transcontinental railroad and on transoceanic steamships. The Zoetrope demonstrates the persistence of vision, patent medicines addict children to morphine, and women are rallying for the vote. In San Francisco, saloons are the booming business, followed by brothels, and the Barbary Coast is a dangerous sink of iniquity. Atop Telegraph Hill bloody jousting tournaments are held and in Chinatown the tongs deal in opium, murder-for-hire, and slave girls.
Zhu Wong, a prisoner in twenty-fifth century China, is given a choice–stand trial for murder or go on a risky time-travel project to the San Francisco of 1895 to rescue a slave girl and take her to safety. Charmed by the city’s opulent glamour, Zhu will discover the city’s darkest secrets. A fervent population control activist in a world of twelve billion people, she will become an indentured servant to the city’s most notorious madam. Fiercely disciplined, she will fall desperately in love with the troubled self-destructive heir to a fading fortune.
And when the careful plans of the Gilded Age Project start unraveling, Zhu will discover that her choices not only affect the future but mean the difference between her own life or death.
“A winning mixture of intelligence and passion.” The New York Times Book Review
“Graceful prose. . . .A complex and satisfying plot.” Library Journal
“Rollicking. . . .Dazzling.” Locus Magazine
“Should both leave the reader wanting more and solidify Mason’s position as one of the most interesting writers in science fiction.” Publisher’s Weekly
The cover, by San Francisco artist Tom Robinson, is styled to look like an 1890s billboard.
The Gilded Age is BACK IN PRINT! Order the beautiful trade paperback in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, and in Japan.
The ebook
is at BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords and on Kindle worldwide at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
So there you have it, my friends
. Bantam Books, a division of Random House, published this as The Golden Nineties. Yes, I changed the title. I think the new title is better. (Wish I’d thought of it in the first place) This is the Author’s Preferred Print Edition.
Whether you’re a longtime reader or new, I hope you enjoy this classic!
Join my other patrons on my Patreon page and learn the shocking reason I’ve opted for Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/lisamasonfantasyandsciencefictionwriter?alert=2
Donate in my time of need from your PayPal account to lisasmason@aol.com.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
Please disregard any ad you see here. They have been placed without my permission.