Archives for posts with tag: The Story Collection Storybundle

Wild Things Cover Final

Wild Things by C. C. Finlay

I first met Charlie (virtually) when he became the editor of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in January, 2015. When I began choosing titles for The Story Collection Storybundle, I wondered if this short story expert had a collection of his own. No surprise—of course he does! And we’re in luck because Charlie specially prepared the ebook of his fine hardcover collection, Wild Things, for Storybundle. Fasten your seatbelt—you’re about to travel from a high fantasy King Arthur tale, to mining asteroids in deep space, to the American Revolutionary War, and much more in The Story Collection Storybundle.
–Lisa Mason

C.C. Finlay is the author of half a dozen books and dozens of stories. His stories have been republished in numerous Year’s Best reprints, nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, Sturgeon, and other awards, and translated into sixteen languages. He’s the ninth editor of the eminent Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Finlay has also taught at Clarion, Clarion YA, Alpha Writers, and Odyssey Online Writing Classes. He’s the resident editor for the Online Writing Workshops.

Here’s what the critics have to say about C. C. Finlay’s Wild Things:

“[T]hese stories show Finlay exploring a variety of genres, bringing freshness and intelligence to them all… an absorbing and often surprising collection.” – Booklist

“Finlay shows himself to be a versatile writer of imaginative fiction in his first story collection… these 14 tales display an insightful knowledge of human nature.” –Publishers Weekly

“Finlay displays an astonishing range, an active imagination and a developing assurance and control: a writer to watch.” – Kirkus

“Finlay’s stories will endure.” – Ideomancer

Visit Charlie at ccfinlay.com and on Twitter at @ccfinlay. He’s on Facebook, too.

Donning his editor’s fedora, Charlie points out that all of the authors in The Story Collection Storybundle have published stories in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (F&SF). So while you’re raiding your discretionary funds (a.k.a. The Cookie Jar) to purchase the bundle, consider a subscription to the longest running, continuously published SF/F magazine since 1949 at https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Philip K. Dick Award Finalist Lewis Shiner, Errantry by four-time World Fantasy Award-winning Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by two-time Nebula Award-winning Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by multi-award-winning Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by New York Times Notable Book Author Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, the editor of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and 6 Stories by Bram Stoker Award-winning Kathe Koja.

The time has come, the end is near. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only two more days till June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Grab this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity while it lasts, and enjoy world-class reading over the summer and beyond.

Six Stories Cover Final

6 Stories by Kathe Koja
When I discovered that Kathe has a beautiful trade paper story collection but the publisher didn’t offer an ebook, I asked her if she could prepare a mini-collection for the Story Collection Storybundle. She cherry-picked these stories from diverse anthologies. Her acclaimed visceral style is intimately grounded in her characters so that a reader may easily empathize with people on the edge of society, sometimes on the edge of sanity, and experience their revelations. Enjoy Kathe’s exclusive 6 Stories in the Story Collection Storybundle.
–Lisa Mason

Praise for Kathe Koja’s short fiction:

“Daring . . . reminiscent of Poe and Calvino . . . In these stories, Koja uses her considerable gift for sensory description to real purpose.” – Publishers Weekly

“Koja’s provocative storylines and evocative prose combine reality with invention, the supernatural with the everyday.” – New York Times Book Review

For more about Kathe and her books, stories, and performance art, visit her at http://www.kathekoja.com/blog/. On Twitter, visit her @KatheKoja.

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Philip K. Dick Award Finalist Lewis Shiner, Errantry by four-time World Fantasy Award-winning Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by two-time Nebula Award-winning Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by multi-award-winning Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by New York Times Notable Book Author Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, the editor of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and 6 Stories by Bram Stoker Award-winning Kathe Koja.

The time has come, the end is near. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until this Thursday, June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Grab this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity while it lasts, and enjoy world-class reading over the summer and beyond.

What I Didn't See Cover Final

Here are the stories you’ll find in Karen Joy Fowler’s story collection, What I Didn’t See:

The Pelican Bar
Booth’s Ghost
The Last Worders
The Dark Always
Familiar Birds
Private Grave 9
The Marianas Islands
Halfway People
Standing Room Only
What I Didn’t See
King Rat

“An exceptionally versatile author . . . Fowler has “the best possible combination of imagination and pragmatism,” as she applies unique narratives into carefully crafted structures.”
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“In all these stories, Fowler (“Sarah Canary,” “The Jane Austen Book Club”) delights in luring her readers from the walks of ordinary life into darker, more fantastical realms. There, as one of her characters remarks, “Your eyes no longer impose any limit on the things you can see.” . . . Fowler’s closing story, “King Rat,” is a masterpiece. Reading more like a personal essay than fiction, it pays eloquent tribute to “the two men I credit with making me a writer.” Here’s a volume that serves as a fine introduction to Fowler, if you haven’t come across her before—and one that will deeply satisfy fans who’ve been with her from the beginning.”
Seattle Times

“One of those writers who can write an almost thoroughly mainstream realistic story and nearly convince us we’re reading SF, or write an SF story and convince us we’re reading mainstream realism.”
Locus

“That rare writer who can match the power of her novels with the power of her short stories. She works in the world of myth with great ease. We feel, reading her stories, that we are in our world, but some portion of it that connects vitally with everything else. What happens here is gripping, important, compelling, and often terrifying. Her new collection of stories, ‘What I Didn’t See’ offers readers perfect renderings of a New American Mythos”
Rick Kleffel, The Agony Column

Karen Joy Fowler takes the short story in directions readers could never anticipate, and her latest collection from the wonderful Small Beer Press, What I Didn’t See: Stories, offers up numerous delights for the smart and creative reader. From the wham-bang start of “The Pelican Bar” to the Hemingway-esque title story, Fowler takes you from the past to the future in stories that feature speculative fiction elements, or are starkly true to life. Cast your preconceived notions aside and settle in to explore the human mysteries Fowler mines with abandon. This is literature at its most intriguing, and a reminder of how bold and daring a gifted writer can be.”
—Colleen Mondor, Bookslut

“The practicality of her views is what makes them upsetting, a reminder how tragedies great and small affect people every day even if we aren’t privy to them. And that is where Fowler succeeds — even if her brutal boarding houses or Congolese misadventures aren’t real to us, post-traumatic stress disorder is. All of her narrators are survivors, and they tell their stories in blunt, practical ways we imagine they need to protect themselves.”
For Books’ Sakes

“Fowler cements her place in fiction history–genre or otherwise–not because of her fancy tricks but through sheer technique and her excellence in characterization.”
—Charles Tan, Bibliophile Stalker

Visit Karen at http://karenjoyfowler.com for more about her stories and books.

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

The Green Leopard Plague Cover Final

Here are the stories you’ll find in Walter Jon Williams’ collection, The Green Leopard Plague:

Lethe
Asimov’s Science Fiction, September 1997
Daddy’s World
Not of Woman Born, ed. Constance Ash, Roc, 1999
The Last Ride of German Freddie
Worlds That Weren’t, ed. Laura Anne Gilman, Roc, 2002
The Millennium Party
Infinitematrix.net, August 2002
The Green Leopard Plague
Asimov’s Science Fiction, October-November 2003
The Tang Dynasty Underwater Pyramid
Scifiction.com, August 4, 2004
Incarnation Day
Escape from Earth, ed. Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois, SFBC, 2006
Send Them Flowers
The New Space Opera, ed. Jonathan Strahan and Gardner Dozois, Harper Eos, 2007
Pinocchio
The Starry Rift: Tales of New Tomorrows, ed. Jonathan Strahan, Viking, 2007

For more about Walter, his books and stories, and his expert advice and opinions about writing, visit him at http://www.walterjonwilliams.net

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

Errantry Cover Final

Here’s the table of contents for Elizabeth Hand’s Errantry: Strange Stories:

The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon
Near Zennor
Hungerford Bridge
The Far Shore
Winter’s Wife
Cruel Up North
Summerteeth
The Return of the Fire Witch
Uncle Lou
Errantry

“Classically engaging tales you could read aloud around a fire late at night to induce trembles and sighs. Hand’s stories glue right on to memory and become truly resonant and inexplicable. We find ourselves wrapped in an evocation without knowing fully how she got us there, shivering with fear at an image of lights or blinking with awe at the modest beauty of a small, rare creature living its life, seen from a distance.” — Aimee Bender, Washington Post

“Hand’s stories are surreal, haunting and beautiful. I’m scared to disturb the intricate and delicate worlds that Hand has created in this collection of stories that alternately draw me in and scare me away . . .  She leads the reader lightly down a thickly wooded trail between disparate universes littered with loss, despair, spiritual pilgrimages and restless characters.” — Minneapolis Star Tribune

“The magic in Elizabeth Hand’s short fiction can usually be found at its edges, just slightly out of reach. It’s there for a moment, but it’s hard to see without squinting. If you blink, it might be gone—but you’d never lose the sense that it’s still there, pushing in on reality from the outside. A gorgeous set of stories.” — Tor.com

Visit Liz and learn more about her books and stories at www.elizabethhand.com.

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

Errantry Cover Final

ERRANTRY

By Elizabeth Hand

I WAS HANGING OUT IN Angus’s apartment above the print shop, scoring some of his ADHD medication, when Tommy Devaraux ran upstairs to tell us he’d just seen the Folding Man over at the Old Court Grill. This was some years after the new century had cracked open and left me and my friends scrambled, even more feckless than we’d been thirty years earlier when we met as teenagers in Kamensic Village. The three of us had been romantically involved off and on during high school and for a few years afterward, held together by the wobbly gravitational pull exerted by adolescence and the strange, malign beauty of Kamensic, a once-rural town that had since been ravaged by gentrification and whose name had recently been trademarked by a domestic housewares tycoon.

Angus had never left Kamensic; he’d spent the last three decades nurturing a musical career that never quite took off, despite a minor 1977 hit that continued to generate residuals and a ringtone that now echoed eerily across the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. His most recent job had been with a brokerage firm absorbed by MortNet. The three kids from his first marriage were grown, but the younger ones, twins, had just started school, and child support and legal bills from the second divorce had stripped him of almost everything.

His ex-wife Sheila and the twins remained in the MacMansion out by Kamensic Meadows, but Angus lived in a third-floor flat he rented from another old friend who owned the struggling printing company below. The entire rickety wood-frame building smelled of dust and ink, the faintly resinous odor of paper mingled with acrid chemical pigments and the reek of melted plastic. In bed at night in Angus’s room, with the old presses rumbling on the floor below, it felt as though we were on board a train. Walls and floors vibrated around us and a sallow streetlamp coated the window with a syrupy greenish light. A few yards away, real trains racketed between the city and the outer exurbs.

I lived sixty miles north of Kamensic, in the next county, but spent more time in my old stomping grounds than reason or propriety allowed. Angus was my half-brother, the result of what Shakespearean scholars term a bed-trick. We didn’t know of our complicated parentage when we first slept together, but once we learned about it we figured it was too late and what the hell. Few people besides us ever knew, and most of them are now dead. My own career, as assistant professor of Arthurian studies at a small college upstate, had flamed out due to accusations of sexual harassment (dropped when a student recanted his story) and drug and alcohol abuse (upheld). Despite my dismissal, I found work as a private tutor, coaching rich kids on their college admissions essays.

“Vivian,” Tommy said breathlessly when I opened the door. “Angus here?”

I brushed my cheek against Tommy’s as he swept inside and crossed to where Angus sat hunched over his computer. Tommy peered at the monitor and frowned. “Where’s Estelle?”

Tommy had a little obsessive thing that dovetailed neatly with Angus’s frenetic energy, as in their latest collaboration, a thirty-seven-song cycle Angus was writing about Estelle, an imaginary woman based on a real woman, a stockbroker Tommy had dated once. He became obsessed with her, and she eventually hit him with a restraining order and moved to Vermont.

Angus scowled. “I’m taking a break from freaking Estelle.”

“Well, sacrifice that Voidwalker and log off,” said Tommy. “I just saw the Folding Man.”

To find out more about the Folding Man, you must read Errantry by Elizabeth Hand in The Story Collection Storybundle.

For more about Liz and her stories and books, visit www.elizabethhand.com.

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Relax over the summer with these great story collections!

Here’s the table of contents for Lewis Shiner’s Collected Stories to give you a taste:

Introduction by Karen Joy Fowler
Perfidia
Stuff of Dreams
The War at Home
Straws
Nine Hard Questions about the Nature of the Universe
White City
Primes
The Long Ride Out
Sitcom
The Death of Che Guevara
His Girlfriend’s Dog
Deep Without Pity
The Circle
Twilight Time
Jeff Beck
Wild For You
Till Human Voices Wake Us
Flagstaff
Tommy and the Talking Dog
Oz
Love In Vain
Steam Engine Time
Kings of the Afternoon
Sticks
Mark the Bunny
The Killing Season
Scales
Snowbirds
Match
Relay
Castles Made of Sand
Prodigal Son
Mozart in Mirrorshades
Kidding Around
Mystery Train
Secrets
Golfing Vietnam
Stompin’ at the Savoy
Gold
Dirty Work
Lizard Men of Los Angeles

Containing 41 stories and extensive author’s notes, Collected Stories is the definitive compilation of Shiner’s short fiction, and shows why Publishers Weekly praised his “exquisite story construction” and why Jonathan Carroll said that he “writes with enough heart for three chests.”

“These 41 powerful stories cover Shiner’s career across three decades and multiple genres, showcasing hard-edged, often political genre fiction at its finest….Shiner never fails to astound, and this collection highlights everything that makes him one of today’s best storytellers.”
—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“With Collected Stories, Lewis Shiner cements his position as one of the SF field’s most accomplished practitioners. His humanism and his compassion are evident in even the more pessimistic explorations of power struggles, and reveal a thoughtful and erudite exploration of how and why human beings treat one another the way they do. Shiner’s prose sparkles with humanity, with empathy, and with clarity. Taken as a whole, the collection is a gift of narrative, a multifaceted examination into what it means to be a human being in any universe.”
—Jason Eric Lundberg, Strange Horizons

“That may be Shiner’s greatest talent, the ability—like all the masters of the short fiction form—to create characters we can care about, can even relate to, in brief tales and in the most incredible circumstances. Regardless of allegory or fantasy, what makes his Collected Stories so memorable is the humanity at their heart. This is a substantial collection in every sense, one that places Lewis Shiner among the finest of today’s short story practitioners.”
—James A. Gardner, blogcritics.org

For more about Lewis Shiner’s books and stories, please visit lewisshiner.com

The Story Collection Storybundle is live but only for fifteen more days! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

Collected Stories Cover Final

PERFIDIA

By Lewis Shiner

“’That’s Glenn Miller,” my father said.  “But it can’t be.”

He had the back of the hospital bed cranked upright, the lower lid of his left eye creeping up in a warning signal I’d learned to recognize as a child.  My older sister Ann had settled deep in the recliner, and she glared at me too, blaming me for winding him up.  The jam box sat on the rolling tray table and my father was working the remote as he talked, backing up my newly burned CD and letting it spin forward to play a few seconds of low fidelity trombone solo.

“You know the tune, of course,” he said.

“’King Porter Stomp.’”  Those childhood years of listening to him play Glenn Miller on the console phonograph were finally paying off.

“He muffed the notes the same way on the Victor version.”

“So why can’t it be Miller?” I asked.

“He wouldn’t have played with a rabble like that.”  The backup musicians teetered on the edge of chaos, playing with an abandon somewhere between Dixieland and bebop.  “They sound drunk.”

My father had a major emotional investment in Miller.  He and my mother had danced to the Miller band at Glen Island Casino on Long Island Sound in the summer of 1942, when they were both sixteen.  That signature sound of clarinet and four saxes was forever tied up for him with first love and the early, idealistic months of the war.

But there was a better reason why it couldn’t have been Miller playing that solo.  If the date on the original recording was correct, he was supposed to have died three days earlier.”

We’ve got a mystery on our hands! And all sorts of revelations to unfold. Lew’s love of swing music and his expertise shine (so to speak) in this fine story. Learn about the mystery of Glenn Miller’s death during World War II and much more in The Story Collection Storybundle.

Lewis Shiner is the author of BLACK & WHITE, FRONTERA, and the World Fantasy Award-winning GLIMPSES, among other novels. He’s also published four short story collections, journalism, and comics. Virtually all of his work is available for free download at www.fictionliberationfront.net.

Visit Lew and learn more about his books and stories at lewisshiner.com.

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live but time is running out! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Enjoy world-class stories for your summer vacation and beyond!

We’re pleased to present Pat Murphy’s Introduction to Women Up To No Good:

“I love writing short stories.

It is, I freely admit, a foolish vice. As a career strategy, writing short stories is just barely better than being a poet. There’s no money in it. If you want to make a living, better write a novel or two—or better yet, a series of fat books with similar themes. Short stories get no respect. Novels are reviewed; short stories, not so much.

But I love reading short stories. When I have fifteen minutes to spare, I can dive into a short story—experience another world, live another life—and emerge in plenty of time to get back to my real life.

And I really do love writing short stories. I can carefully examine every word and nuance of a short story, polishing each one. I can keep the entire piece in mind at once—no sprawling plot lines and extra bits that dangle off the edges. I can take risks and experiment—it’s only a short story; why not try something daring?

In many ways I think short stories are like the first little mammals in the days of the dinosaurs, way back in the Mesozoic Era. Short stories are hot-blooded little beasts, packing a lot of energy into a very small space. These furtive critters are always looking nervously over their furry shoulders at great hulking novels that could accidentally stomp them flat with one enormous reptilian foot.

Until recently, the life of a short story has usually been wretchedly short. Most of the stories reprinted here first appeared in magazines, enjoying a brief moment of glory when the magazine came out, then vanishing with publication of the magazine’s next issue. Short stories are the mayflies of the literary world—appearing briefly only to vanish again, ephemeral, a flash of light in the darkness.

But that’s changing.

With ebooks like this one, a short story can have a new life in electronic form. This, I think, suits the nature of the short story—ephemeral, experimental, a flash of light in the darkness.

Untreed Reads, the publisher of this collection, has been publishing some of my early short stories as ebooks. New readers and reviewers have been discovering and appreciating work that was unavailable for years.

As a lover of short stories (my own and those of others), I celebrate this wonderful new world. I say leave the bookshelves to the novels, those great and lumbering beasts. Let the short stories, small and agile, occupy the new spaces as they quietly plan world domination.”

See an interview with Pat Murphy on Cartographic Analysis of the Dream State, one of the stories in Women Up To No Good at http://openbooksociety.com/article/pat-murphy-author-of-a-cartographic-analysis-of-the-dream-state-exclusive-intervie/

So there you have it, my friends. The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection. Once it’s gone, it’s gone!

“Daddy’s World”

By Walter Jon Williams

One day Jamie went with his family to a new place, a place that had not existed before. The people who lived there were called Whirlikins, who were tall, thin people with pointed heads. They had long arms and made frantic gestures when they talked, and when they grew excited threw their arms out wide to either side and spun like tops until they got all blurry. They would whirr madly over the green grass beneath the pumpkin-orange sky of the Whirlikin Country, and sometimes they would bump into each other with an alarming clashing noise, but they were never hurt, only bounced off and spun away in another direction.

Sometimes one of them would spin so hard that he would dig himself right into the ground, and come to a sudden stop, buried to the shoulders, with an expression of alarmed dismay.

Jamie had never seen anything so funny. He laughed and laughed.

His little sister Becky laughed, too. Once she laughed so hard that she fell over onto her stomach, and Daddy picked her up and whirled her through the air, as if he were a Whirlikin himself, and they were both laughing all the while.

Afterwards, they heard the dinner bell, and Daddy said it was time to go home. After they waved goodbye to the Whirlikins, Becky and Jamie walked hand-in-hand with Momma as they walked over the grassy hills toward home, and the pumpkin-orange sky slowly turned to blue.

The way home ran past El Castillo. El Castillo looked like a fabulous place, a castle with towers and domes and minarets, all gleaming in the sun. Music floated down from El Castillo, the swift, intricate music of many guitars, and Jamie could hear the fast click of heels and the shouts and laughter of happy people.

But Jamie did not try to enter El Castillo. He had tried before, and discovered that El Castillo was guarded by La Duchesa, an angular, forbidding woman all in black, with a tall comb in her hair. When Jamie asked to come inside, La Duchesa had looked down at him and said, “I do not admit anyone who does not know Spanish irregular verbs!” It was all she ever said.

Jamie had asked Daddy what a Spanish irregular verb was—he had difficulty pronouncing the words—and Daddy had said, “Someday you’ll learn, and La Duchesa will let you into her castle. But right now you’re too young to learn Spanish.”

That was all right with Jamie. There were plenty of things to do without going into El Castillo. And new places, like the country where the Whirlikins lived, appeared sometimes out of nowhere, and were quite enough to explore.

The color of the sky faded from orange to blue. Fluffy white clouds coasted in the air above the two-story frame house. Mister Jeepers, who was sitting on the ridgepole, gave a cry of delight and soared toward them through the air.

“Jamie’s home!” he sang happily. “Jamie’s home, and he’s brought his beautiful sister!”

Mister Jeepers was diamond-shaped, like a kite, with his head at the topmost corner, hands on either sides, and little bowlegged comical legs attached on the bottom. He was bright red. Like a kite, he could fly, and he swooped through in a series of aerial cartwheels as he sailed toward Jamie and his party.

Becky looked up at Mister Jeepers and laughed from pure joy. “Jamie,” she said, “you live in the best place in the world!”

At night, when Jamie lay in bed with his stuffed giraffe, Selena would ride a beam of pale light from the Moon to the Earth and sit by Jamie’s side. She was a pale woman, slightly translucent, with a silver crescent on her brow. She would stroke Jamie’s forehead with a cool hand, and she would sing to him until his eyes grew heavy and slumber stole upon him.

The birds have tucked their heads

The night is dark and deep

All is quiet, all is safe,

And little Jamie goes to sleep.

Whenever Jamie woke during the night, Selena was there to comfort him. He was glad that Selena always watched out for him, because sometimes he still had nightmares about being in the hospital. When the nightmares came, she was always there to comfort him, stroke him, sing him back to sleep.

Before long the nightmares began to fade.

Are you starting to get nervous about Jamie? I sure am! You’ll have to acquire The Story Collection Storybundle and read this Nebula Award winning story to find out.

For more about Walter, his books and stories, and his expert advice and opinions about writing, visit him at http://www.walterjonwilliams.net. Visit him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/walter.j.williams.54.

So there you have it, my friends. I told you we were lucky! The Story Collection Storybundle is live! You the reader name your price—whatever you feel the books are worth. You may even designate a portion to go to a charity. Savor traditionally published, multi-award-winning stories from diverse and varied publications which the authors have collected for you.

The Bundle includes What I Didn’t See (a World Fantasy Award Winner) by Karen Joy Fowler (the New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club), Collected Stories by Lewis Shiner, Errantry by Elizabeth Hand, The Green Leopard Plague by Walter Jon Williams, Women Up to No Good by Pat Murphy, Strange Ladies: 7 Stories by Lisa Mason, Wild Things by C. C. Finlay, and 6 Stories by Kathe Koja.

But you must act now. The Story Collection Storybundle lasts only until June 2, 2016 at https://storybundle.com/storycollection