Oh, now I understand.
Why in the October 25, 2021 The New Yorker issue, Paul McCartney published “Writing ‘Eleanor Rigby’”, an interesting, engaging brief account of how the song was written, how the song’s names got chosen, the “happy accidents” that helped form the Beatles when they were still teenagers, and feedback given to McCartney about his poetry in the song by Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. “Eleanor Rigby” is considered a breakthrough song by the Beatles because it was written NOT to be performed onstage.
Why?
Because McCartney published an 874-page book (!!!) called “Lyrics, 1956 to Present” in the U.K. and probably in the U.S (and elsewhere). The book was reviewed in the December, 10, 2021 issue of TLS.
In conjunction with The Beatles: Get Back, the 15-hour documentary directed by Peter Jackson on Disney and the book, The Beatles: Get Back, edited by John Harris, also both reviewed in the December, 10, 2021 issue of TLS.
That’s why.
The Beatles and their managers were always good with publicity. I remember, as a child, looking at a young teenage friend’s Beatles’ cards—like baseball cards.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US
, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The CHROME ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Summer of Love
is BACK IN PRINT in the U.S., U.K.,  France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan, and now in Australia.
The Summer of Love ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
The Gilded Age
is BACK IN PRINT! Order the beautiful trade paperback in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, in Japan and in Australia.
The ebook
is at BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords and on Kindle worldwide at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, new reviews, interviews, round tables, cute cat pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Over the Christmas weekend, Tom and I saw five movies he borrowed for free from our wonderful local library. We’d never seen any of them before so each movie was a new experience.
Blythe Spirit” (2021) Based on the classic Noӗl Coward’s play, a best-selling, financially successful crime writer in 1937 suffers a terrible (and hilarious) writer’s block while writing a screenplay based his own story. His second wife strives to keep him on track: she herself wants to move from London to Hollywood. The writer invites Madame Acarti (a marvelous Judi Dench), a mostly fraudulent spiritualist medium to hold a private séance at his house. Madame Acarti turns out to have some real psychic power after all and summons the ghost of his deceased first wife, who may have given the writer most of his award-winning ideas. (There is a joke about “ghost writing”) The ghost isn’t happy about the presence of the quite-alive second wife living in her house and sleeping with her husband. Laugh-out-loud funny and witty, the plot turns darker toward the end. Recommended for viewers who enjoy a sophisticated comedy (without profanity).
Pompeii” (2014) I just read a fascinating article about the Pompeii ruins in recent days in The New Yorker so Tom picked up this movie. Set against the volcano about to erupt two thousand years ago, this tells the story of slave (a boy formerly from the Celtic Horse Tribe taken prisoner by Roman invaders) who becomes a gladiator in the arena of Pompeii and falls in love with a wealthy merchant’s daughter (and she with him). The luxurious ancient city DID have gladiators fight to death in a magnificent arena. The story is derivative of one of my favorite movies, “Gladiator,” but that didn’t spoil our enjoyment. Spectacular special effects as the volcano erupts, which was witnessed at the time and written about by Pliny the Younger. A tragic ending. (There were preserved corpses in the layers of volcanic ash who were kissing with their last breath.) Recommended for serious viewers of historical drama.
“The Magical Legend of the Leprechauns” (1999) For a delightful change of pace, this complex fantasy interweaves a romance tale between an American man (secretly a developer who is scouting rustic properties to develop) and an Irish woman with a romance tale between a leprechaun boy and a fairy girl. The latter romance causes a war between the leprechauns and the fairies reminiscent of “Romeo and Juliet”. No plot spoilers here! There are two brief scenes with Irish tap dancers (who I could watch for hours!). But the ends of all the interwoven tales are happy. Whoopi Goldberg as the Grand Banshee is wonderful. Recommended for all fantasy viewers.
Mary Shelley” (2018) Elle Fanning well plays the teenage Mary Shelley (the actress resembles the historical figure), the daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft, a famous 18th century feminist, writer, and advocate of “free love,” and an anarchist writer-philosopher father, William Godwin who owned a bookshop in London. Mary is always writing as a teenager. She’s close to her step-sister and distant from Godwin’s second wife (Wollstonecraft died within a month of giving birth to Mary). At one of her father’s literary salons, she meets the dashing poet Percy Shelley (Douglas Booth, who also resembles the historical figure). They fall madly in love, but Percy is more an advocate of “free love” than Mary. As a writer, I find it fascinating to see the many influences on the author to create a literary work, including the infamous weekend in Geneva with Lord Byron (drugs, sex, and ghost stories). Mary Shelley went on to write six novels, including a science fiction and an historical, and short stories, but the work she is best known for is “Frankenstein or Prometheus Unbound” written and published when she was eighteen years old. A bit slow, but recommended for serious viewers who are interested in writers’ lives.
The Bookshop” (2017 ) Rounding out the weekend with TWO bookshops and TWO writers, this film (based on a novel) tells the true story of a widow, in 1959 England, coming to a conservative seaside town with a dream in her heart of opening a bookshop. Against all odds, she succeeds in opening a charming bookshop and is popular among the town people, including an old reclusive widower who loves books. She stocks Ray Bradbury and Vladimir Nabokov, among other controversial titles. But (for no good reason, other than jealousy perhaps) she draws the ruthless opposition of the local grand dame who seeks to destroy her shop. Slow but recommended for serious viewers
So there you have it, my friends. A lot of good movies were made some years ago, you only to find them.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The CHROME ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Summer of Love
is Print in the U.S., U.K.,  France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan, and now in Australia.
The Summer of Love ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
The Gilded Age
is BACK IN PRINT! Order the beautiful trade paperback in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, in Japan and in Australia.
The ebook
is at BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords and on Kindle worldwide at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, new reviews, interviews, round tables, cute cat pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Tom borrowed more The New Yorker magazines for free from our lovely local library. Here are the articles I recommend: I’ll leave it up to you find the online links.
December 6, 2021 Issue
“Electricity and the Body” by Jerome Groopman
. The article begins with Groopman’s account—he and his wife are doctors—of his frightening tachycardia episode that nearly killed him. The article goes on to discuss the medicinal use of electricity throughout history. The ancients observed that the stone amber could transmit electricity (I call it “the amber” in my Arachne Trilogy) and believed wearing an amber necklace, men and women, would protect the wearer from all kinds of diseases. Then there were “electrical belts” in Victorian times, worn by men to give them “sexual vitality”. There is electroshock therapy, used today (more safely) to alleviate severe suicidal depression. A fascinating article recommended for serious readers.
November 29, 2021 Issue
“Pompeii’s Hidden Layer” by Rebecca Mead.
The author’s recent visit to the archeological site (four million visitors a year go there) is the preface to an account of historical efforts to excavate the ruins, which were discovered by monks drilling a water well in the 1700s. The fabulous, doomed city was buried under eighty feet of ash from the disastrous massive eruption of the volcano, Mt. Vesuvius. Only 30% or so of the ruins have been excavated, which activities were very dangerous—the overlying ash could collapse, destroying the ruins below—and trapped volcanic gases were still deadly. What treasures awaited the excavators, though—the colors on the murals and the floors were still as vibrant as they were two thousand years ago. Highly recommended. (I want to go visit! Over Christmas weekend, we saw the movie, “Pompeii”, which was very enjoyable (but derivative of “Gladiator”.)
“The Garden of Forking Paths” by Nicola Twilley. A maze-maker and his mazes, with color photographs. Recommended.
“The Decoders of the Rosetta Stone” by Jean Acocella. The Rosetta Stone is the key to decoding Egyptian hieroglyphs (which no one understood for centuries) and two other ancient languages, carved by some genius in Greece. Like the ruins of Pompeii, the Stone was discovered by accident, and it took a while from linguists to decode it. Recommended.
April 12, 2021 Issue
There’s an article about the artist, Helen Frankenthaler, in this issue but I don’t want to go into it—I will be too sarcastic and I don’t want to do that about another woman artist.
There’s an article, “The Zeitgeist of Midnight Cowboy” by Louis Menard. Reviewing the book “Shooting ‘Midnight Cowboy” by Glenn Frankel which was also reviewed in The Times Literary Supplement. To Hollywood’s surprise, the film won the Oscar for Best Picture and nominated for more categories. There’s some controversy about the film, which Tom and I possess (thanks to a neighbor) in a Director’s Cut. I recommend seeing the Director’s Cut for the additional fifteen minutes of Joe Buck’s previous life after he embarks on his quest to New York City. I don’t want to get into the controversies. You can look up the articles, on both sides of the Atlantic, for yourself. Suffice it to say, I find it a moving film of friendship in a cold, lonely megacity, and I always cry at the end.
November 6, 2021 Issue
“What a Feeling: How to Have More Energy” by Nick Paumgarten.
The author begins this article by describing he’s having “brownouts” on afternoons working at home during the pandemic. And further goes to say politicians, writers, artists, and entrepreneurs “regardless of talent” have huge success with “high energy.” (Hmm, I know persons who have that.) He goes on to discuss the issue of energy—how you can get more or, if you can’t, how to cope. Check it out.
November 15, 2021 Issue
“Towering Infernos: Life on the front line of megafires” by M. R. O’Conner
. This fascinating look particularly on megafires, how much more dangerous they are—they send massive smoke plumes so high up in the atmosphere that the force of the smoke interferes with jet airplanes. The article focuses on the firefighters—one firefighter, who served nine tours of duty in Iraq, remarked on being in a war zone was not nearly as dangerous on the fireline of a megafire. Many firefighters suffer PTSS, many of them commit suicide. This is may have been publicity for the subsequent federal legislation benefiting the firefighting effort (raising the firefighters’ low wages, for example) but I’m a Californian and I support it.
Finally, “Kandinsky at the Guggenheim” by Peter Schjeldahl about the show at the museum. With a full-color illustration of one of Kandinsky’s paintings. I like some of his paintings, others not (they’re sloppy and not planned well enough).
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

 

Updated for 2022! New pages for the forthcoming SPYDER, ODDITIES: 22 Stories, and CHROME, all ebooks and print books, worldwide links, stories, new reviews, interviews, round tables, cute cat pictures, the fine art and bespoke jewelry by Tom Robinson, and more! Visit www.lisamason.com

At her mother’s urgent deathbed plea, Abby Teller enrolls at the Berkeley College of Magical Arts and Crafts to learn Real Magic. To support herself through school, she signs on as the superintendent of the Garden of Abracadabra, a mysterious, magical apartment building on campus.
She discovers that her tenants are witches, shapeshifters, vampires, and wizards and that each apartment is a fairyland or hell.
On her first day in Berkeley, she stumbles upon a supernatural multiple murder scene. One of the victims is a man she picked up hitchhiking the day before.
Torn between three men—Daniel Stern, her ex-fiance who wants her back, Jack Kovac, an enigmatic FBI agent, and Prince Lastor, a seductive supernatural entity who lives in the penthouse and may be a suspect—Abby will question what she really wants and needs from a life partner.
Compelled into a dangerous murder investigation, Abby will discover the first secrets of an ancient and ongoing war between Humanity and Demonic Realms, uncover mysteries of her own troubled past, and learn that the lessons of Real Magic may spell the difference between her own life or death.
The Garden of Abracadabra is an ebook on BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords.
On Kindle in the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Australia, and India.
The Garden of Abracadabra is in Print in the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Japan
, and Australia.
“So refreshing. . . .This is Stephanie Plum in the world of Harry Potter.”
Goodreads: “I loved the writing style and am hungry for more!”
Amazon.com: “Fun and enjoyable urban fantasy”
This is a very entertaining novel—sort of a down-to-earth Harry Potter with a modern adult woman in the lead. Even as Abby has to deal with mundane concerns like college and running the apartment complex she works at, she is surrounded by supernatural elements and mysteries that she is more than capable of taking on. Although this book is just the first in a series, it ties up the first “episode” while still leaving some story threads for upcoming books. I’m looking forward to finding out more.”
The Garden of Abracadabra was, in part, inspired by the Garden of Allah, a townhouse and apartment complex in Hollywood, California. New Yorker writers, like Robert Benchley and Dorothy Parker and F. Scott Fitzgerald, who went to L.A. to write screenplays, and actors like the Marx Brothers and Errol Flynn lived it up there and created quite a scandalous reputation for the place. “Big Yellow Taxi,” the song by Joni Mitchell was inspired when the city razed the place to the ground and built a strip mall over the ruins. “They paved Paradise and put up a parking lot,” the line goes.
5.0 out of 5 stars fast-paced occult/ suspense/ mystery murder story well worth reading
Garden of ABRACADABRA from Lisa Mason, author of the wondrous scifi time travel book, Summer of Love, which, despite being fiction, may be one of the most accurate histories written about San Francisco, and the Haight/Asbury hippie scene.
Ms Mason does it again weaving history into a fantasy/ occult yarn. Once upon a time in the 60’s, the late Issac Bonewitz went to UC Berkeley, in Oakland/ Berkeley CA, just across the bay from San Fran. He talked Berkeley into letting him major in Magick, not stage magic but ritual Magick! He got an independent study degree, the first and last BA in Magick. True story! (Since then Berkeley has tightened up topics for independent study) . After his degree, Bonewitz became a wizard of sorts and wrote many books including one entitled “Real Magic”, about his ideas, studies and adventures.
In the last century, English dark occultist Aleister Crowley also performed a great deal of ritual Magick, and destroyed the hierarchy of the Hermetic Order of Golden Dawn, the most famous English occult order, from which we get the most popular Coleman tarot deck, Eden Gray, and many occult books. Crowley wrote “Book of the Law”, “Book of Lies”, “Magick in Theory and Practice” etc. Crowley regularly sponsored sex and drug orgies among his followers and fancied himself a “Laird”, Scottish royalty, despite no evidence.
Ms Mason’s book contains fictionalized characters based on the real Bonewitz and Crowley. The heroine is Abby Teller, another fledgling occultist with budding powers. Thrown into this mix of occultists is an FBI guy Jack Kovac, an agent assigned to hunt down occultist criminals. He investigates murders with occult overtones. Abby enrolls in college at a fictionalized UC Berkeley to study Magick. She also gets finagled into managing an apartment full of vampires, and other occultists, including the rich sinister Aleister Crowley character named “Prince Laster”. The top floor penthouse of her apartment, she discovers, is linked up with a portal to another dimension. Abby has a relationship with a bad-news seedy old boyfriend, Dan Stern, also a dark side occultist. She goes to UC Berkeley Magick Dept “Professor Bonewiz” to get advice how to deal with these various demonic wierdos, including the vampires, (who come across to me like San Francisco’s hyper aggressive panhandlers…)-
Ms Mason has written a heady mixture, highly entertaining. A fast-paced occult/ suspense/ mystery murder story well worth reading! Abby Teller wears high heels and pantyhose which not only make her legs look pretty but also will prevent an evil spell from getting “inside” her lower chakra. Who knew? Despite some poor decisions, Abby Teller seems more charmingly feminine than many of today’s fictional crop of macho tomboys .
And what is Abracadabra other than a place name? A spell repeated, leaving off a letter at a time. At the end, abracadbra is supposed to make a demon diminish and ultimately vanish.
More Lisa Mason books with Abby Teller are promised I’m looking forward to the next.
So there you have it, my friends! I’m delighted to announce The Garden of Abracadabra is in print and an ebook worldwide.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
Please disregard any ad you see here. They have been placed without my permission.

Updated for 2021! Published in print in eight countries and as an ebook on eighteen markets worldwide.
As I mulled over my published short fiction (now forty-plus stories) for my first collection, I found seven wildly different stories with one thing in common–a heroine totally unlike me. I’m the girl next door. I have no idea where these strange ladies came from.
In The Oniomancer (Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine), a Chinese-American punk bicycle messenger finds an artifact on the street. In Guardian (Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine), an African-American gallerist resorts to voodoo to confront a criminal. In Felicitas (Desire Burn: Women Writing from the Dark Side of Passion [Carroll and Graf]), an immigrant faces life as a cat shapeshifter. In Stripper (Unique Magazine), an exotic dancer battles the Mob. In Triad (Universe 2 [Bantam]), Dana Anad lives half the time as a woman, half the time as a man, and falls in love with a very strange lady. In Destination (Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction), a driver takes three strangers from a ride board on a cross-country trip as the radio reports that a serial killer is on the loose. In Transformation and the Postmodern Identity Crisis (Fantastic Alice [Ace]), Alice considers life after Wonderland.
Five stars on Facebook and Amazon! “Great work, Lisa Mason!”
“Hilarious, provocative, profound.”
From Jeanne-Mary Allen, Author on Facebook and the Book Brothers Blog: “Kyle Wylde and I are thrilled to have found such a talented, dedicated, and brilliant collection of shorts in Strange Ladies: 7 Stories…Your style/craft is highly impressive.”
From the San Francisco Book Review: “Strange Ladies: 7 Stories offers everything you could possibly want, from more traditional science fiction and fantasy tropes to thought-provoking explorations of gender issues and pleasing postmodern humor…This is a must-read collection.” http://anotheruniverse.com/strange-ladies-7-stories/
From the Book Brothers Review Blog: “Lisa Mason might just be the female Philip K. Dick. Like Dick, Mason’s stories are far more than just sci-fi tales, they are brimming with insight into human consciousness and the social condition….Strange Ladies: 7 Storiesis a sci-fi collection of excellent quality. If you like deeply crafted worlds with strange, yet relatable characters, then you won’t want to miss it.” http://www.thebookbrothers.com/2013/09/the-book-brothers-review-strange.html#more
And on Amazon: 5.0 out of 5 stars This one falls in the must-read category, an appellation that I rarely use.
“I have been a fan of Lisa Mason from the beginning of her writing career, but I confess that I often overlook her short fiction. That turns out to have been a big mistake! I have just read Strange Ladies thinking I would revisit a few old friends and discover a few I had missed. Well, I had missed more than I had thought, and I regret that oversight. This collection was so much fun! I loved each and every story and enjoyed their unique twists, turns, and insights. I thank Ms Mason especially, though, for the high note ending with the big smiles in Transformation and the Postmodern Identity Crisis. Uh oh, I guess I still am a child of the summer of love. Well played. You made me laugh at the world and myself.”
“I’m quite impressed, not only by the writing, which gleams and sparkles, but also by [Lisa Mason’s] versatility . . . Mason is a wordsmith . . . her modern take on Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland is a hilarious gem! [This collection] sparkles, whirls, and fizzes. Mason is clearly a writer to follow!”—Amazing Stories
5.0 out of 5 stars Great collection that will make you think
Format: Kindle Edition
“My definition of a good short story is one that you keep thinking about for days, and this book had several of them.”
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories (“A must-read collection—The San Francisco Review of Books). On Nook, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.
On Kindle at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is in Print in the U.S., in the U.K., in Germany, in France, in Spain, in Italy, and in Japan. New! Now in
Australia.New! My second collection ODDITIES: 22 Stories in print and an ebook.Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, worldwide links, beautiful covers, reviews, interviews, blogs, round-tables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, and more!

Tom borrowed more The New Yorker magazines for free from our lovely local library. Here are the articles I recommend: (I’ll leave it to you to track down the online link.)
September 13, 2021:issue
“The Sex Wars” by Amia Srinivasan
. An overview of the feminist movement when it first started in the 1960s until now and the current controversies among the movement.
“Force of Nature” by Gideon Lewis-Kraus. About the scientist Kathryn Paige Harden and the current scientific and sociological controversies about Nature versus Nurture.|
October 11, 2021 issue
“Hollywood on Trial”
by Michael Schulman. The Fatty Arbuckle scandal, the first celebrity scandal, involving a woman’s death, that cost the wildly successful actor his career.
“The Ghost Birds” by Karen Russell, the author of “Swamplandia!”. A straight-up science fiction story with touches of fantasy that would have worked published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction or Asimov’s Magazine, but got published in The New Yorker. I liked the story but had some problems with it.
A New Biography of Oscar Wilde by Clare Bucknell. Nothing new here—Wilde was the son of theatrical parents, got married and had three children, and—you know the rest. For fans of Oscar Wilde.
October 25, 2021 issue
“Writing ‘Eleanor Rigby’” by Paul McCartney
. There’s a story behind every story, and now there’s a story about the song. Interesting account of how the names got chosen, the “happy accidents” that helped form the Beatles when they were still teenagers, and feedback given to McCartney about his poetry in the song by Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. Who knew? “Eleanor Rigby” is considered a breakthrough song by the Beatles because it was written NOT to be performed onstage.
What Stephen Crane Did for the Novel by Adam Gopnik. About the writer of “The Red Badge of Courage.” Crane started writing professionally at age twenty as a hardboiled newspaper reporter. He’s given credit for streamlining novelistic prose, but he got involved in controversy with (ahem) “ladies of the evening” and lived beyond his means at the end of his life.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US
, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

From Goodreads came the first review of One Day in the Life of Alexa:
One Day in the Life of Alexa
, by Lisa Mason (Bast Books) incorporates lively prose, past/present time jumps, and the consequences of longevity technology. Kosovo refugee Alexa enrolls in a secret pilot program designed to extend her life span. Her best friend, Marya, is not accepted, but Marya’s infant aka “Little Monster” is. As the decades roll by, Alexa adapts to a life of constant measurement and surveillance. [Plot spoilers omitted] In reflection, the book is as much about the enduring trauma of war as it is about longevity technology, and in this it feels more like mainstream than science fiction. Mason’s skill as a writer sustains a quick, absorbing read with an appealing narrator and subtly powerful emotional rhythms (like the repeated refrain, “No matter how long I live, I will always remember this”)
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35200314-one-day-in-the-life-of-alexa#other_reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Lisa Mason doesn’t disappoint us on that issue and gives us a look …
By R Bruce Miller
Format: Kindle Edition
“Scifi is nominally about the future and the impact of technology on society. Lisa Mason doesn’t disappoint us on that issue and gives us a look at a desirable biotechnology with some serious long-term and unforeseen consequences. However, like all the truly great scifi writers, what she really writes about is you and me and today and what is really important in life. Alexa lives an improbable life and yet, somehow, is a very real everywoman. Solzhenitsyn would have appreciated the homage. Cats! Grow your own organic food! Yes, there is much fun to be had on this journey, but the message nonetheless is solid and important. I enjoyed every word even though this book spoiled my day because I had no choice but to read it in one sitting while drinking too much coffee.”
And here’s another five-star review, and then I’ll let you decide:
“[Alexa] finds her internal resource that allows her to survive many more days in a much more uplifting manner than poor Ivan Denisovich. Discovering where her strengths [lie] is not depressing but uplifting for this reader.” On US Kindle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0711PP65J
“I truly loved Alexa. The homage to Solzhenitsyn was wonderfully well done. Your concept and characters were on the mark and very timely. Bravo!”
Book Description:
Alexa Denisovitch
, a refugee from Kosovo during the 1999 war, is just seventeen when she is accepted by GenGineer Laboratories as a Tester for Longeva, a revolutionary additive that may significantly extend her longevity.
But becoming a Tester has unintended consequences and Longeva causes devastating unforeseen side effects.
Confronting environmental, political, and personal perils of the future, Alexa must grapple with the tough questions of life, love, and death.
So there you have it, my friends. The novel is short, but I took a long time researching and writing it.
One Day in the Life of Alexa is in Print in the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Japan, and Australia.
Now an ebook on BarnesandNoble, Kobo, Apple, and Smashwords!
One Day in the Life of Alexa is also offered as a Kindle ebook at US Kindle, UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, France Kindle, Germany Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Spain Kindle, Brazil Kindle, Mexico Kindle, India Kindle, and Japan Kindle.
Donate a tip to the tip jar at PayPal to http://paypal.me/lisamasonthewriter.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, worldwide links, beautiful covers, reviews, interviews, blogs, round-tables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, and more!

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, Tom and I saw eight movies he borrowed for free from our wonderful local library. Except for “My Fair Lady”, we’d never seen any of them before. So each movie was a new experience.
Westworld (1973) Written and directed by Michael Crichton, this is a fascinating premise. The cutting between the expensive “reality theme parks” with realistic robots and the behind-the-scenes technicians with their computers controlling everything is effective. Yul Brynner is especially frightening as “the gunslinger”. Then things go terribly wrong—no plot spoilers from me! The story is exciting and gripping until the end, when it fizzles out. It’s as if Crichton ran out of ideas.  Recommended, especially for science fiction and thriller fans.
Funny Face (1957) Starring Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire. The story is overlong and never quite coheres of an intellectual beauty who works in a New York City bookstore and how she gets discovered as a fashion model by a magazine photographer. Astaire can dance, but Audrey can REALLY dance. She rejects the young handsome philosopher for the old man fashion photographer. Is this a brand Hepburn was developing? That a much younger woman gets transformed from a plain girl into a glamorous woman and goes off with an older man? She did that in “Sabrina”, this movie, and “My Fair Lady”. Recommended especially for fans of Audrey Hepburn.
Passengers (2017) The actors, Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt, were at the top of their game and got paid millions for this movie. Which was a huge flop at the box office. That didn’t deter Tom and me from seeing it. The film is overlong and mixes passionate romance and science fiction, two genres that don’t always mix well for viewers. Still, it was an interesting premise—5,000 passengers and 250 crew are put in hibernation pods awaiting their arrival at a distant habitable plane 99 years from now–had moments of suspense and excitement, a falling-out of the protagonists, and ultimately a happy ending. Recommended for viewers who want to be entertained by a mix of genres.
Downton Abbey (2019)  As an egalitarian American, I dislike “Upstairs, Downstairs” dramas, the rich and poor classes in England. Apparently there is a series on television (I don’t watch TV, either), but this was a delightful movie. The King and Queen are going to visit Downton Abbey (which looks like a castle) for a dinner—one night—and  bringing their own staff of cooks, dressers, detectives, and servants. And off we go, the aristocrats are worried about the visit going well and the servants are fighting among themselves. Witty and engaging. Recommended for fans of, well, the Downton Abbey TV series.
Capricorn One (1978) The film has an interesting premise for anyone who entertained the notion that the Moon walk was faked. This time it’s a trip to Mars that gets faked. I’m surprised that NASA allowed its name to be used as a fraudulent, murderous organization. (Maybe the filmmakers got sued, I don’t know.) The Mars astronauts supposedly get killed on re-entry to Earth, and the chase is on. There are plenty of plot holes, Hollywood logic, and not-so-amazing coincidences. It’s not a great movie, but recommended for science fiction fans.
Closer to the Moon (2015 ) This film is based on a true story of 1959 Bucharest under Communist rule. Five high-ranking Jewish members of the Party staged a bank heist and were sentenced to death. But before they face a firing squad, they enact the bank heist for a propaganda film. Darkly humorous, very scary, and unstinting, going backwards and forwards in time. Recommended for serious viewers.
Archive (2020) Recalling “Ex Machina”, a scientist attempts to recreate his wife who was killed in a car accident. Her memories are preserved in “the Archive” but only for so long. The scientist lives alone in a technological house on a cliff facing a steep waterfall, has created two more primitive AI entities who apparently love him. The end has a shocking twist this viewer didn’t see coming. Recommended for science fiction viewers.
My Fair Lady (1964) I’ve already had my say about this dreadful movie on my personal Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/lisa.mason.7393264. Misogynist, cold, classist, mean.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
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I just discovered two new five-star reviews of CYBERWEB while I was collecting the new print links. This book was originally published in hardcover by William Morrow, trade paperback by Eos, and mass paperback by AvoNova. Now a new trade paperback from Bast Books, CYBERWEB is the sequel to ARACHNE and Book 2 of the Arachne Trilogy. SPYDER, Book 3 of the Arachne Trilogy, is coming in 2022.
4.0 out of 5 starsDEEPER THAN DEEP
Format: Paperback
On re-reading CYBERWEB a year later, I don’t think my first review does it justice. The writer has peeled off the difference between conscious robots and flesh and blood man. Almost without fanfare the robots are provided with souls. Her mechanical characters are given both consciousness and emotion. Their only difference to man is in their composition. This becomes very clear when the outmoded Spinner character uploads herself into Patina’s flashy, lifeless bodywork.
I MUST NOW RATE THIS BOOK FIVE STARS.
The writer, thus, dives deeply into the unseen world that controls man’s apparent freewill existence. By using mainframes as purposeful beasts, seeking to control fleshy man, some very deep philosophical questions are posed. She leaves it up to the reader to fill in the blanks to this very entertaining and thoughtful story.
THE OLD REVIEW READ:
Mason leads her cyberpunk reader into the arena of sci-fi comics. It’s not possible for humans to grasp the feelings and desires of these robot characters but it’s still a lot of fun to try. She challenges your imagination to follow her characters’ avatars, cones, cubes and three headed chimeras as they flit in and out of cyberspace. But hard questions are run up the flagpole. Can bodiless people exist in this virtual world of telespace? Can a soul exist in a nonorganic body? Should robots be discarded like machines when a new model arrives? Can our culture continue to absorb the changes computer power is unleashing? Is our reality but an extension of the bits composing telespace? Even the questions of what consciousness might consist of and whether it is really an advantage to being born as flesh and blood. She makes no attempt to answer these questions but even considering them makes this book a very creative endeavor. You could certainly invest your time on a much less entertaining story. Also it is short and sweet.
5.0 out of 5 starsInteresting…pretty cool actually…
Format: Paperback
Cyberweb is a pretty nifty cyberpunk novel…lots of interesting ideas…I liked it…
So there you have it, my friends. One reader at a time…..
Get the beautiful paper tradeback of CYBERWEB in Print in the U.S., in the U.K., in Germany, in France, in Spain, in Italy, in Japan, and in Australia.
Cyberweb
is an ebook on US Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords.
Cyberweb is also on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, Brazil Kindle, France Kindle, Germany Kindle, India Kindle, Italy Kindle, Japan Kindle, Mexico Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, and Spain Kindle.
Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, beautiful covers, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!