Archives for posts with tag: Lisa Mason

Oh, now I understand.
Why in the October 25, 2021 The New Yorker issue, Paul McCartney published “Writing ‘Eleanor Rigby’”, an interesting, engaging brief account of how the song was written, how the song’s names got chosen, the “happy accidents” that helped form the Beatles when they were still teenagers, and feedback given to McCartney about his poetry in the song by Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. “Eleanor Rigby” is considered a breakthrough song by the Beatles because it was written NOT to be performed onstage.
Why?
Because McCartney published an 874-page book (!!!) called “Lyrics, 1956 to Present” in the U.K. and probably in the U.S (and elsewhere). The book was reviewed in the December, 10, 2021 issue of TLS.
In conjunction with The Beatles: Get Back, the 15-hour documentary directed by Peter Jackson on Disney and the book, The Beatles: Get Back, edited by John Harris, also both reviewed in the December, 10, 2021 issue of TLS.
That’s why.
The Beatles and their managers were always good with publicity. I remember, as a child, looking at a young teenage friend’s Beatles’ cards—like baseball cards.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US
, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The CHROME ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Summer of Love
is BACK IN PRINT in the U.S., U.K.,  France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan, and now in Australia.
The Summer of Love ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
The Gilded Age
is BACK IN PRINT! Order the beautiful trade paperback in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, in Japan and in Australia.
The ebook
is at BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords and on Kindle worldwide at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, new reviews, interviews, round tables, cute cat pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Over the Christmas weekend, Tom and I saw five movies he borrowed for free from our wonderful local library. We’d never seen any of them before so each movie was a new experience.
Blythe Spirit” (2021) Based on the classic Noӗl Coward’s play, a best-selling, financially successful crime writer in 1937 suffers a terrible (and hilarious) writer’s block while writing a screenplay based his own story. His second wife strives to keep him on track: she herself wants to move from London to Hollywood. The writer invites Madame Acarti (a marvelous Judi Dench), a mostly fraudulent spiritualist medium to hold a private séance at his house. Madame Acarti turns out to have some real psychic power after all and summons the ghost of his deceased first wife, who may have given the writer most of his award-winning ideas. (There is a joke about “ghost writing”) The ghost isn’t happy about the presence of the quite-alive second wife living in her house and sleeping with her husband. Laugh-out-loud funny and witty, the plot turns darker toward the end. Recommended for viewers who enjoy a sophisticated comedy (without profanity).
Pompeii” (2014) I just read a fascinating article about the Pompeii ruins in recent days in The New Yorker so Tom picked up this movie. Set against the volcano about to erupt two thousand years ago, this tells the story of slave (a boy formerly from the Celtic Horse Tribe taken prisoner by Roman invaders) who becomes a gladiator in the arena of Pompeii and falls in love with a wealthy merchant’s daughter (and she with him). The luxurious ancient city DID have gladiators fight to death in a magnificent arena. The story is derivative of one of my favorite movies, “Gladiator,” but that didn’t spoil our enjoyment. Spectacular special effects as the volcano erupts, which was witnessed at the time and written about by Pliny the Younger. A tragic ending. (There were preserved corpses in the layers of volcanic ash who were kissing with their last breath.) Recommended for serious viewers of historical drama.
“The Magical Legend of the Leprechauns” (1999) For a delightful change of pace, this complex fantasy interweaves a romance tale between an American man (secretly a developer who is scouting rustic properties to develop) and an Irish woman with a romance tale between a leprechaun boy and a fairy girl. The latter romance causes a war between the leprechauns and the fairies reminiscent of “Romeo and Juliet”. No plot spoilers here! There are two brief scenes with Irish tap dancers (who I could watch for hours!). But the ends of all the interwoven tales are happy. Whoopi Goldberg as the Grand Banshee is wonderful. Recommended for all fantasy viewers.
Mary Shelley” (2018) Elle Fanning well plays the teenage Mary Shelley (the actress resembles the historical figure), the daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft, a famous 18th century feminist, writer, and advocate of “free love,” and an anarchist writer-philosopher father, William Godwin who owned a bookshop in London. Mary is always writing as a teenager. She’s close to her step-sister and distant from Godwin’s second wife (Wollstonecraft died within a month of giving birth to Mary). At one of her father’s literary salons, she meets the dashing poet Percy Shelley (Douglas Booth, who also resembles the historical figure). They fall madly in love, but Percy is more an advocate of “free love” than Mary. As a writer, I find it fascinating to see the many influences on the author to create a literary work, including the infamous weekend in Geneva with Lord Byron (drugs, sex, and ghost stories). Mary Shelley went on to write six novels, including a science fiction and an historical, and short stories, but the work she is best known for is “Frankenstein or Prometheus Unbound” written and published when she was eighteen years old. A bit slow, but recommended for serious viewers who are interested in writers’ lives.
The Bookshop” (2017 ) Rounding out the weekend with TWO bookshops and TWO writers, this film (based on a novel) tells the true story of a widow, in 1959 England, coming to a conservative seaside town with a dream in her heart of opening a bookshop. Against all odds, she succeeds in opening a charming bookshop and is popular among the town people, including an old reclusive widower who loves books. She stocks Ray Bradbury and Vladimir Nabokov, among other controversial titles. But (for no good reason, other than jealousy perhaps) she draws the ruthless opposition of the local grand dame who seeks to destroy her shop. Slow but recommended for serious viewers
So there you have it, my friends. A lot of good movies were made some years ago, you only to find them.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The CHROME ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Summer of Love
is Print in the U.S., U.K.,  France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan, and now in Australia.
The Summer of Love ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
The Gilded Age
is BACK IN PRINT! Order the beautiful trade paperback in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, in Japan and in Australia.
The ebook
is at BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords and on Kindle worldwide at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, new reviews, interviews, round tables, cute cat pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Tom borrowed more The New Yorker magazines for free from our lovely local library. Here are the articles I recommend: I’ll leave it up to you find the online links.
December 6, 2021 Issue
“Electricity and the Body” by Jerome Groopman
. The article begins with Groopman’s account—he and his wife are doctors—of his frightening tachycardia episode that nearly killed him. The article goes on to discuss the medicinal use of electricity throughout history. The ancients observed that the stone amber could transmit electricity (I call it “the amber” in my Arachne Trilogy) and believed wearing an amber necklace, men and women, would protect the wearer from all kinds of diseases. Then there were “electrical belts” in Victorian times, worn by men to give them “sexual vitality”. There is electroshock therapy, used today (more safely) to alleviate severe suicidal depression. A fascinating article recommended for serious readers.
November 29, 2021 Issue
“Pompeii’s Hidden Layer” by Rebecca Mead.
The author’s recent visit to the archeological site (four million visitors a year go there) is the preface to an account of historical efforts to excavate the ruins, which were discovered by monks drilling a water well in the 1700s. The fabulous, doomed city was buried under eighty feet of ash from the disastrous massive eruption of the volcano, Mt. Vesuvius. Only 30% or so of the ruins have been excavated, which activities were very dangerous—the overlying ash could collapse, destroying the ruins below—and trapped volcanic gases were still deadly. What treasures awaited the excavators, though—the colors on the murals and the floors were still as vibrant as they were two thousand years ago. Highly recommended. (I want to go visit! Over Christmas weekend, we saw the movie, “Pompeii”, which was very enjoyable (but derivative of “Gladiator”.)
“The Garden of Forking Paths” by Nicola Twilley. A maze-maker and his mazes, with color photographs. Recommended.
“The Decoders of the Rosetta Stone” by Jean Acocella. The Rosetta Stone is the key to decoding Egyptian hieroglyphs (which no one understood for centuries) and two other ancient languages, carved by some genius in Greece. Like the ruins of Pompeii, the Stone was discovered by accident, and it took a while from linguists to decode it. Recommended.
April 12, 2021 Issue
There’s an article about the artist, Helen Frankenthaler, in this issue but I don’t want to go into it—I will be too sarcastic and I don’t want to do that about another woman artist.
There’s an article, “The Zeitgeist of Midnight Cowboy” by Louis Menard. Reviewing the book “Shooting ‘Midnight Cowboy” by Glenn Frankel which was also reviewed in The Times Literary Supplement. To Hollywood’s surprise, the film won the Oscar for Best Picture and nominated for more categories. There’s some controversy about the film, which Tom and I possess (thanks to a neighbor) in a Director’s Cut. I recommend seeing the Director’s Cut for the additional fifteen minutes of Joe Buck’s previous life after he embarks on his quest to New York City. I don’t want to get into the controversies. You can look up the articles, on both sides of the Atlantic, for yourself. Suffice it to say, I find it a moving film of friendship in a cold, lonely megacity, and I always cry at the end.
November 6, 2021 Issue
“What a Feeling: How to Have More Energy” by Nick Paumgarten.
The author begins this article by describing he’s having “brownouts” on afternoons working at home during the pandemic. And further goes to say politicians, writers, artists, and entrepreneurs “regardless of talent” have huge success with “high energy.” (Hmm, I know persons who have that.) He goes on to discuss the issue of energy—how you can get more or, if you can’t, how to cope. Check it out.
November 15, 2021 Issue
“Towering Infernos: Life on the front line of megafires” by M. R. O’Conner
. This fascinating look particularly on megafires, how much more dangerous they are—they send massive smoke plumes so high up in the atmosphere that the force of the smoke interferes with jet airplanes. The article focuses on the firefighters—one firefighter, who served nine tours of duty in Iraq, remarked on being in a war zone was not nearly as dangerous on the fireline of a megafire. Many firefighters suffer PTSS, many of them commit suicide. This is may have been publicity for the subsequent federal legislation benefiting the firefighting effort (raising the firefighters’ low wages, for example) but I’m a Californian and I support it.
Finally, “Kandinsky at the Guggenheim” by Peter Schjeldahl about the show at the museum. With a full-color illustration of one of Kandinsky’s paintings. I like some of his paintings, others not (they’re sloppy and not planned well enough).
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, Tom and I saw eight movies he borrowed for free from our wonderful local library. Except for “My Fair Lady”, we’d never seen any of them before. So each movie was a new experience.
Westworld (1973) Written and directed by Michael Crichton, this is a fascinating premise. The cutting between the expensive “reality theme parks” with realistic robots and the behind-the-scenes technicians with their computers controlling everything is effective. Yul Brynner is especially frightening as “the gunslinger”. Then things go terribly wrong—no plot spoilers from me! The story is exciting and gripping until the end, when it fizzles out. It’s as if Crichton ran out of ideas.  Recommended, especially for science fiction and thriller fans.
Funny Face (1957) Starring Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire. The story is overlong and never quite coheres of an intellectual beauty who works in a New York City bookstore and how she gets discovered as a fashion model by a magazine photographer. Astaire can dance, but Audrey can REALLY dance. She rejects the young handsome philosopher for the old man fashion photographer. Is this a brand Hepburn was developing? That a much younger woman gets transformed from a plain girl into a glamorous woman and goes off with an older man? She did that in “Sabrina”, this movie, and “My Fair Lady”. Recommended especially for fans of Audrey Hepburn.
Passengers (2017) The actors, Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt, were at the top of their game and got paid millions for this movie. Which was a huge flop at the box office. That didn’t deter Tom and me from seeing it. The film is overlong and mixes passionate romance and science fiction, two genres that don’t always mix well for viewers. Still, it was an interesting premise—5,000 passengers and 250 crew are put in hibernation pods awaiting their arrival at a distant habitable plane 99 years from now–had moments of suspense and excitement, a falling-out of the protagonists, and ultimately a happy ending. Recommended for viewers who want to be entertained by a mix of genres.
Downton Abbey (2019)  As an egalitarian American, I dislike “Upstairs, Downstairs” dramas, the rich and poor classes in England. Apparently there is a series on television (I don’t watch TV, either), but this was a delightful movie. The King and Queen are going to visit Downton Abbey (which looks like a castle) for a dinner—one night—and  bringing their own staff of cooks, dressers, detectives, and servants. And off we go, the aristocrats are worried about the visit going well and the servants are fighting among themselves. Witty and engaging. Recommended for fans of, well, the Downton Abbey TV series.
Capricorn One (1978) The film has an interesting premise for anyone who entertained the notion that the Moon walk was faked. This time it’s a trip to Mars that gets faked. I’m surprised that NASA allowed its name to be used as a fraudulent, murderous organization. (Maybe the filmmakers got sued, I don’t know.) The Mars astronauts supposedly get killed on re-entry to Earth, and the chase is on. There are plenty of plot holes, Hollywood logic, and not-so-amazing coincidences. It’s not a great movie, but recommended for science fiction fans.
Closer to the Moon (2015 ) This film is based on a true story of 1959 Bucharest under Communist rule. Five high-ranking Jewish members of the Party staged a bank heist and were sentenced to death. But before they face a firing squad, they enact the bank heist for a propaganda film. Darkly humorous, very scary, and unstinting, going backwards and forwards in time. Recommended for serious viewers.
Archive (2020) Recalling “Ex Machina”, a scientist attempts to recreate his wife who was killed in a car accident. Her memories are preserved in “the Archive” but only for so long. The scientist lives alone in a technological house on a cliff facing a steep waterfall, has created two more primitive AI entities who apparently love him. The end has a shocking twist this viewer didn’t see coming. Recommended for science fiction viewers.
My Fair Lady (1964) I’ve already had my say about this dreadful movie on my personal Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/lisa.mason.7393264. Misogynist, cold, classist, mean.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

 

 

Here You Enter
Yesterday, Tomorrow & Fantasy
When I was mulling over stories to publish in my second collection, I noticed the stories fell into historical, futuristic, and fantasy categories.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories includes those previously published in Omni Magazine, Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Full Spectrum 5, The Shimmering Door, Peter S. Beagle’s Immortal Unicorn, David Copperfield’s Tales of the Impossible, Not One of Us Fiction and Poetry Journal, and Daily Science Fiction, plus six new stories.
“I find myself constantly surprised by the breadth of styles, places, and characters in this collection. ….sometimes you want to be surprised; and that’s what Ms. Mason delivers in this collection…. Like Ray Bradbury’s short stories, these never fail to surprise you with little sparkles and occasional rockets going off and spreading happy fireworks in your brain!”
Amazing Stories Online Review Part I https://amazingstories.com/2020/09/new-book-review-lisa-masons-oddities-part-1/
Amazing Stories Online Review Part II
https://amazingstories.com/2020/10/lisa-masons-oddities-review-part-ii/
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Japan, and in Australia.
Donate at paypal at http://paypal.me/lisamasonthewriter
Visit me at www.lisamason.com updated for 2021 for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, beautiful covers, reviews, interviews, blogs, round tables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
Please disregard any ad you see here. They have been placed without my permission.

 

 

New Review of The Gilded Age at http://sfbookreview.blogspot.com/2017/12/the-gilded-age-by-lisa-mason.html:
“The world of 2495 is at an unsustainable twelve billion population. Zhu Wong is a Daughter of Compassion, a group working to enforce the birth restriction laws. She is in jail awaiting trial when she is recruited by the Luxon Institute for Superluminal Applications (LISA, I love the acronym) to t-port back to 1895 San Francisco. She accepts the deal. Her mission is to find Wing Sing, take her and the aurelia to the mission run by Donaldina Cameron. In 1967 Wing Sing’s daughter will eventually give the brooch to Chiron at the end of his stay in the Summer of Love project.
Zhu finds Wing Sing, but she doesn’t have the aurelia. They are captured by a Chinese gang. Zhu is bought away from them by Jessie, a madam, Wing Sing stuck with the Tong. Zhu does work for Jessie, but is more valuable as a bookkeeper so avoids becoming a prostitute. Daniel Watkins is the son of a real estate magnate coming to San Francisco to collect on debts. He is low on funds and is referred to lodging at Jessie’s where his life becomes entwined with Zhu’s. Somehow Zhu is attracted to this heavy drinking smoker who has distinct views of women. Despite herself and her mission, Zhu cares about Jessie and Daniel.
I loved the character of Zhu. Somehow I wasn’t repulsed by Daniel and Jessie. They are more a product of their environment doing what they can with their sense of right and wrong. Very enjoyable, I read the last two hundred pages straight through. This is definitely a stand alone novel, though Summer of Love is mentioned several times. I’ll have to read that one as a prequel rather than book one.”
And this is from Library Journal:
“The discovery of a golden brooch that should not exist in the 25th century prompts the Luxon Institute to send a young Chinese woman 600 years back in time. She arrives in San Francisco in 1895 to prevent the future from altering the past. This sequel to Summer of Love (LJ 6/15/94), seen through the eyes of an observer from the future, juxtaposes the tempestuous, sprawling milieu of boomtown San Francisco with its shadowy underside of prostitution and decadence. Mason’s graceful prose and her skill in orchestrating a complex and satisfying plot make this a solid purchase for sf collections.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
This is from a reader:
https://www.amazon.ca/Golden-Nineties-Lisa-Mason/dp/0553373315
5.0 out of 5 stars Hypnotic Read
By,Robin Booneon Published on Amazon.com|Verified Purchase
“Lisa Mason’s Summer of Love and The Golden Nineties both have this quality – you want to reread them as soon as you’ve read them. Her writing conveys an abiding love of San Francisco, and interesting bits of California history are woven into the storylines. The writing is so compelling that you feel as though time travel were a possibility. I hope she writes more of these San Francisco fantasies!”
And this is from Publisher’s Weekly
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-553-37331-8
“Mason’s sequel to Summer of Love is a delightful expansion of that work and a major step forward for her. The tale centers on Zhu Wong, a Chinese national whose lawyer plea-bargains her release from prison so that Chiron and his companions from the previous novel’s Luxon Institute for Superluminal Applications can transport her 600 years into the past to find a macguffin called the aurelia. Once in San Francisco, 1895, Mason brings the environment and the times to life with her rendering of the city’s activities, especially its corruption. The several historic personages who appear–including Frank Norris, Jack London and Susan B. Anthony–are all given dimensions that reflect the rigor of Mason’s research without leaving the reader overburdened by minutiae. Zhu Wong finds herself embroiled in a world of decadence and prostitution; she sees friends and companions abuse themselves with such things as alcohol, cocaine and corsets. As with Karen Joy Fowler’s Sarah Canary, Mason uses the novel partially to explore the role of women in society. As Zhu grows to understand the hypocrisies of the 1890s, she becomes even less comfortable with the presumptions of her own time. She creates several “closed time loops,” apparent paradoxes that impede her mission–and, perhaps more important, thwart her own desires. Eventually she finds her way out of the time loops and in the process teaches everyone–including herself–a few lessons about life. Her bravura performance with this book should both leave the reader wanting more and solidify her position as one of the most interesting writers in science fiction.
And this just in from an Amazon.com reader
Buy It
By Uke Enthusiast
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
“One of my favorite books. I am delighted it is back in print. A thoroughly entertaining time travel story supported by vivid characterizations and settings.”
Book Description
: The year is 1895 and immigrants the world over are flocking to California on the transcontinental railroad and on transoceanic steamships. The Zoetrope demonstrates the persistence of vision, patent medicines addict children to morphine, and women are rallying for the vote. In San Francisco, saloons are the booming business, followed by brothels, and the Barbary Coast is a dangerous sink of iniquity. Atop Telegraph Hill bloody jousting tournaments are held and in Chinatown the tongs deal in opium, murder-for-hire, and slave girls.
Zhu Wong, a prisoner in twenty-fifth century China, is given a choice–stand trial for murder or go on a risky time-travel project to the San Francisco of 1895 to rescue a slave girl and take her to safety. Charmed by the city’s opulent glamour, Zhu will discover the city’s darkest secrets. A fervent population control activist in a world of twelve billion people, she will become an indentured servant to the city’s most notorious madam. Fiercely disciplined, she will fall desperately in love with the troubled self-destructive heir to a fading fortune.
And when the careful plans of the Gilded Age Project start unraveling, Zhu will discover that her choices not only affect the future but mean the difference between her own life or death.
“A winning mixture of intelligence and passion.” The New York Times Book Review
“Graceful prose. . . .A complex and satisfying plot.” Library Journal
“Rollicking. . . .Dazzling.” Locus Magazine
“Should both leave the reader wanting more and solidify Mason’s position as one of the most interesting writers in science fiction.” Publisher’s Weekly
The cover, by San Francisco artist Tom Robinson, is styled to look like an 1890s billboard.
The Gilded Age is BACK IN PRINT! Order the beautiful trade paperback in the U.S., in the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, in Japan, and nowin Australia.
The ebook
is at BarnesandNoble, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords and on Kindle worldwide at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
So there you have it, my friends
. Bantam Books, a division of Random House, published this as The Golden Nineties. Yes, I changed the title. I think the new title is better. (Wish I’d thought of it in the first place) This is the Author’s Preferred Print Edition.
Whether you’re a longtime reader or new, I hope you enjoy this classic!
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Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!
Please disregard any ad you see here. They have been placed without my permission.

“Clock’s Ticking” by Rachel Syme is a review in The New Yorker July 5, 2021 issue of “The Deadline Effect’ a book by magazine editor Christopher Cox. But the article is as much about Syme as about the book.
The Cox book is about the editor’s efforts to persuade writers to meet their necessary deadlines to publish the magazine on time.
And that’s good—reminding the tardy writer that many other people down the line—the copyeditors, the proofreaders, the publishers, the readers—are depending on YOU to turn in the work.
Part of the article is about Syme’s own difficulty in meeting her deadlines as a independent journalist. There are some journalists, she writes, who sensibly budget their time researching, writing, and editing and there are some—like her—who wait till the last minute and panic—often writing inaccuracies, incompleteness, and bad prose.
I’ll leave you to read the short article, if you’re interested, but my own take on deadlines: I’m good to go on copyediting and proofreading—I always meet my deadlines for those tasks—but  I’ll never write creative content on a deadline EVER again. Something about a deadline stops my creative flow dead—even if I have a proposal, even if I have an outline. Nope. The creative work has to be DONE before I can commit to a publishing deadline.
Do you have trouble with deadlines?
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/07/05/what-deadlines-do-to-lifetimes
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

I’m so thrilled this book is back in print! And as timely as ever!
What readers say:
5.0 out of 5 stars I dig this book!
Reviewed in the United States on March 11, 2020
Summer of Love is a beautiful work of literature encapsulated within the science-fiction genre. It invites you on an emotionally jostling roller coaster ride.
Lisa Mason is a prolific author who weaves a time-travel story that delves into many underlying themes at a micro and macro level during the famous “Summer of Love” pandemic in Haight Ashbury, San Francisco, in 1967.
The author also descends underneath the epidermis of the street’s kaleidoscopic and “groovy” ambiance to reveal what is and what is not through each character’s eyes — and whether or not we can rely on hope to wake us up the next morning.
I felt the characters (even the secondary ones), the moments, the sights, the sounds and the smells of the time. As if I myself was time traveling. I found myself not only reading but tasting each word; sometimes going back to read a sentence, a paragraph or a page again.
This is a novel I will not hesitate to recommend. https://www.amazon.com/dp/1548106119
“This book was so true to life that I felt like I was there. I recommend it to anyone.”
“More than a great science-fiction, a great novel as well.”
“My favourite SF book of all time, beautiful, cynical and completely involving….Unmissable!”
2018 review of SUMMER OF LOVE at http://sfbookreview.blogspot.com/2018/02/summer-of-love-by-lisa-mason.html
”Ever since the Save Betty project completed there has been degradation in the archives. The Luxon Institute for Superluminal Applications (LISA, still love that acronym) has determined that San Francisco in 1967 is a hot dim spot. They commission the Summer of Love project. Twenty-one year old Chiron Cat’s Eye in Draco will t-port from 2467 to the summer of love where he is to find the Axis, a teenage girl from the Midwest will have important descendants, and protect her through the summer. This Susan Stein takes an alias, so Chiron has only probabilities to know if he finds the right girl.
In 1967 Susan receives a postcard from Nance, aka Penny Lane, who is in San Francisco. Her parents find the postcard, tear it up and burn it. She runs away that night and takes the name Starbright. She arrives hoping to see Penny Lane, but instead meets up with Stan the Man, manager of the Double Boogie band. She is invited to live with them in a house that is a constant party. She loves it, but a week later Stan hooks up with someone new. She meets Ruby again and Ruby takes her in. That first night Chiron saw an eye symbol by Ruby’s shop, decided to hang around there and Ruby let him sleep on the couch. He’s not sure that Starbright is the Axis, but there is a high probability. 
Without being preachy major themes in the book include the environment, population control, women’s rights, and addiction. These were put into the setting of real life 1967. Street names referenced in the book exist and the Grateful Dead did have a concert there on August 22. I enjoyed the story without any nostalgic feeling, other than references to old Star Trek episodes and other SF works.
I really enjoyed the book. It was excellent and the first chapter or two set up encounters throughout the rest of the book. I loved all three of the main characters, Starbright, Chiron and Ruby.” By John Loyd
Book Description:
The year is 1967 and something new is sweeping across America: good vibes, bad vibes, psychedelic music, psychedelic drugs, anti-war protests, racial tension, free love, bikers, dropouts, flower children. An age of innocence, a time of danger. The Summer of Love.
San Francisco is the Summer of Love, where runaway flower children flock to join the hip elite and squares cruise the streets to view the human zoo.
Lost in these strange and wondrous days, teenager Susan Bell, alias Starbright, has run away from the straight suburbs of Cleveland to find her troubled best friend. Her path will cross with Chiron Cat’s Eye in Draco, a strange and beautiful young man who has journeyed farther than she could ever imagine.
With the help of Ruby A. Maverick, a wise and feisty half-black, half-white hip entrepreneur, Susan and Chi discover a love that spans five centuries. But can they save the world from demons threatening to destroy all space and time?
A harrowing coming of age. A friendship ending in tragedy. A terrifying far future. A love spanning five centuries. And a gritty portrait of a unique time in American history.
The cover, hand-drawn by Tom Robinson, is styled to look like a 1960s psychedelic poster.
What the professional book reviewers say:
“Captures the moment perfectly and offers a tantalizing glimpse of its wonderful and terrible consequences.” The San Francisco Chronicle
“A fine novel packed with vivid detail, colorful characters, and genuine insight.” The Washington Post Book World
“Remarkable. . . .the intellect on display within these psychedelically packaged pages is clear-sighted, witty, and wise.” Locus Magazine
“Mason has an astonishing gift. Her chief characters almost walk off the page. And the story is as significant as anyone could wish. This book will surely be on the prize ballots.” Analog
“A priority purchase.” Library Journal
5 stars From the Readers
Calling All Fans
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‘Summer of Love is an important American literary contribution that may very well have a strong and viable fan base. Where are you? Join us!
This novel is loads of fun to read. The majority of the characters are hippies from the 1960s who meet a stranger from the future who’s looking to save his world. This fellow, Chiron, needs to find a troubled adolescent teen named Susan (a.k.a. Starbright) for a very compelling reason. The book has a great deal to offer: swift action, lovable characters, spiritual insight, and well-chosen primary documents such as essays, poems, and news articles which round out the reader’s understanding of the worldview of the novel.
I think Summer of Love has excellent potential for a wider audience. I hope it continues to enjoy a healthy amount of sales in the used books market on this site. I wish even more for it to be in wider circulation. Some books talk about the sixties. This novel IS the sixties, thanks to the spirit and scholarship of its author. And, as one reader aptly put it, ‘the sci-fi stuff is just plain off the hook.’ Get a copy. Most people who have read it seem to respect it and enjoy it every bit as much as I do.”
New Reader Review! “Just checked to see if this book was on Kindle. It has been many years since I’ve read it but I remember it as one of my very favorite books. Time to go back and re-read it!”
New Reader Review
Kent Peterson
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fine Story
10 February 2015 – Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Summer of Love, A Time Travel is a fine story. Lisa Mason takes three interesting characters, a time traveller from a future 500 years hence, a 14-year-old midwestern runaway flower child, and hip shopkeeper and places them all in the fascinating place and time that was San Francisco’s Summer of Love, 1967.
Mason has certainly done her homework. You can almost smell the pot and patchouli, see the painted faces and hear the sounds of Janis and the Grateful Dead as Chi, Starbright and Ruby fight to hold on to what really matters at a time when everything seems possible and even the smallest things can have huge consequences.
The time travel plot is nicely (if a bit predictably) done and the glimpses from Chi’s future world are fascinating, frightening and ultimately hopeful. Starbright is 100 percent convincing as a confused, loyal, idealistic, moody teenager who really could hold the key to what is to come. And Ruby Maverick, the shopkeeper who reluctantly gives the two young strangers shelter and strength in a strange and wondrous time is strong and smart and the kind of friend you’d want holding your hand or watching your back when the trip starts going strange.
Summer of Love, A Time Travel is not a rose-colored look backwards. It’s is a kaleidoscopic look at a time of both darkness and light, of confusion and clarity. It’s scary and beautiful, a strange trip where maybe all you need is a little love and some flowers in your hair.
New Reader Review
Eos
5.0 out of 5 starsTime travel done right
20 August 2017 – Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is a longtime favorite novel. Mason’s time travel tale is fascinating as both a tale of the future and of the past. I am delighted it is now available as a Kindle edition as my paperback copy is long past its prime.
New Reader Review
paula ferre
5.0 out of 5 stars… the last 20 years – it is such a great story.
26 September 2016
Verified Purchase
I’ve read this book 3 or 4 times in the last 20 years – it is such a great story.
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So there you have it, my friends. Whether you’re a longtime reader or new to the book, I hope you enjoy this classic.
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“The Big Reveal,” by Louis Menand in the July 5, 2021 issue of The New Yorker is about William Sidney Porter—a.k.a. O Henry—one of the most successful short story writers of all time. Identified as a New York City writer, Porter was in fact born in North Carolina (with mid-1800s Southerner’s attitudes to match) and moved as a young man to Texas. There, he started a weekly magazine called The Rolling Stone for his cartoons and humorous verses, but the magazine was not financially successful. He took a job as a teller at the First National Bank of Austin. A federal bank examiner found a shortage of $5,000 and accused Porter of embezzlement.
Several twists and turns took place after the indictment, which I shall refer you to the article to read, after which Porter was sentenced to five years in prison.
In prison, he wrote fourteen short stories, avidly listening the life stories of his fellow inmates. He was released early for good behavior, and headed to New York City, where he’d never been before. There, he wrote a story a week for The Sunday World, producing sixty-six stories in a year.
He listened to people, took people’s stories, and concocted plots with the trademark “O Henry” twists at the end. He started his method when he was in prison and continued it all his short life. He loved hanging out in bars in NYC, meeting people and hearing their stories. He identified with the “common man,” sold four million of his books in the U.S., and one-and-a-half million books in the Soviet Union.
Despite his publishing success, Porter lived a hand-to-mouth life as a writer. He generously gave money to people who asked him for it. He died of liver disease at age forty-seven.
Porter lived in “the golden age of the short story,” writing alongside short story writers like Edgar Allen Poe, Anton Chekov, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Ernest Hemingway, among others.
Edgar Allen Poe says something fascinating about the short story and the short story’s writer’s obligations—but I won’t reproduce the quotation here. I’ll leave you to read the article.
Recommended for fans of O. Henry, readers of short stories, and anyone interested in the twists and turns of a creative writer’s life.
Here’s the link https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/07/05/are-all-short-stories-o-henry-stories
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
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As I read through a final pass of ODDITIES: 22 Stories, I found recurrent themes and point-of-view characters as protagonists, though I portray each story as a unique universe. Over the span of my career, I’ve tended not to repeat myself.
As Steve Fahnestalk in his Amazing Stories review said: “I find myself constantly surprised by the breadth of styles, places, and characters in this collection. ….sometimes you want to be surprised; and that’s what Ms. Mason delivers in this collection (which also spans pretty much the whole timeline of her short story publications). Like Ray Bradbury’s short stories, these never fail to surprise you with little sparkles and occasional rockets going off and spreading happy fireworks in your brain!”
Let me see:
Three, no, four supernatural entities
Five POV artists! (I wonder why I’m attracted to that character type.) But only one writer. And only one stage magician.
Two psychiatrists.
Two lawyers, corrupt in different ways.
Two very different teenage girls.
Five medical stories.
Two very different ghost stories.
Two very different time stories.
Two telespace stories and one artificial intelligence story.
Tarot magic and ancient Egyptian magic.
Four alien stories, approaching the theme from different perspectives.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle Preorder worldwide until November 17, 2020, including in the US, in theUK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in theNetherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback now available in the US
, in theUK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan.
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Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, reviews, interviews, blogs, roundtables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, worldwide links, and more!