“The Big Reveal,” by Louis Menand in the July 5, 2021 issue of The New Yorker is about William Sidney Porter—a.k.a. O Henry—one of the most successful short story writers of all time. Identified as a New York City writer, Porter was in fact born in North Carolina (with mid-1800s Southerner’s attitudes to match) and moved as a young man to Texas. There, he started a weekly magazine called The Rolling Stone for his cartoons and humorous verses, but the magazine was not financially successful. He took a job as a teller at the First National Bank of Austin. A federal bank examiner found a shortage of $5,000 and accused Porter of embezzlement.
Several twists and turns took place after the indictment, which I shall refer you to the article to read, after which Porter was sentenced to five years in prison.
In prison, he wrote fourteen short stories, avidly listening the life stories of his fellow inmates. He was released early for good behavior, and headed to New York City, where he’d never been before. There, he wrote a story a week for The Sunday World, producing sixty-six stories in a year.
He listened to people, took people’s stories, and concocted plots with the trademark “O Henry” twists at the end. He started his method when he was in prison and continued it all his short life. He loved hanging out in bars in NYC, meeting people and hearing their stories. He identified with the “common man,” sold four million of his books in the U.S., and one-and-a-half million books in the Soviet Union.
Despite his publishing success, Porter lived a hand-to-mouth life as a writer. He generously gave money to people who asked him for it. He died of liver disease at age forty-seven.
Porter lived in “the golden age of the short story,” writing alongside short story writers like Edgar Allen Poe, Anton Chekov, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Ernest Hemingway, among others.
Edgar Allen Poe says something fascinating about the short story and the short story’s writer’s obligations—but I won’t reproduce the quotation here. I’ll leave you to read the article.
Recommended for fans of O. Henry, readers of short stories, and anyone interested in the twists and turns of a creative writer’s life.
Here’s the link https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/07/05/are-all-short-stories-o-henry-stories
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

The October 4, 2021 issue of The New Yorker published nine (magazine) pages of the author Patricia Highsmith’s diary—“A Straight Line in the Darkness”. This reproduction of the diary begins in 1948 when Highsmith was age twenty-seven. At the end of her life, in 1995 at the age of seventy-four, she had written some eight thousand pages of her diary and published twenty-two novels.
Does anyone here keep a diary? I tried years ago, and diary-writing seemed to deplete me of energy of the story writing and novel writing. So I couldn’t keep it up. I tried to keep a dream diary, too. Now I take brief notes of my dreams in my daily planner.
Highsmith’s diary will be published in November, 2021. I don’t know the genesis of the publication. Did Highsmith instruct her heirs to publish the diary or instruct her literary agent? Or did someone just find the 8,000 pages and decide to publish them (which has happened to other authors including, I believe, Philip Roth)?
I just don’t know. Clearly, she meant to keep the diary secret during her long life.
Some entries are written in French or German and have been translated for publication. But most entries are in English. There’s some beautiful writing in there, more beautiful than her published work that I’ve read. In fairness to her, I haven’t read many of her novels.
What explodes out of the diary is her enormous energy and tumultuous engagement with the world. She met a British writer while at a writers’ retreat and became his on-and-off lover, at one point agreeing to marry him only to break it off because she “could not be he wanted.”
In 1950, Alfred Hitchcock paid Highsmith $7,500 for the rights to her first novel, “Strangers on a Train”. In 1950, this was a quite a lot money—the price of a nice house in some regions of the country or a professional’s yearly wage. The film was released in 1951 and, in my movie guide at least, is considered one of Hitchcock’s finest. (I confess I haven’t seen it—I’ll scour my library’s movie selection next time.)
(For comparison, for my 7,000 word short story in OMNI magazine, I was paid for an option of mid-five-figures for four years, then an outright sale of mid-six figures. So, in total, that would be the price of a house in some regions of the country—but barely so, in outlying parts of California.)
Two other films based on Highsmith’s work are “The Talented Mr. Ripley” (based on the novel of the same name) and “Carol” (based on the novel “The Price of Salt” published under a pseudonym in 1952.) Highsmith’s very supportive literary agent and New York editor didn’t want her to get a nonbinary reputation in the 1950s.
Recommended for anyone who is interested in a writer’s life, readers and fans of Patricia Highsmith, and anyone who is interested in the turmoil of a nonbinary life at the midcentury.
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/10/04/a-portrait-of-the-writer-as-a-young-woman
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

lisamasontheauthor

“Vanishing Act” by Alex Ross is a concise history, with house photographs, of the Austrian-born architect Richard Neutra, the pioneer of the Southern California modern architecture in the 1930s. The article appears in the September 27, 2021 issue of The New Yorker.
Neutra’s benchmark was floor-to-ceiling windows and mirrored sliding doors to dissolve boundary between the abundant greenery of Los Angeles and the interior of the house. Like Frank Loyd Wright, he favored flat roofs and minimalist exteriors He sited most of his houses where the residents could enjoy a glorious view.
The architect, as a man, was far different than his calm architecture. He’s been described as pompous and overbearing, barging into his clients’ houses without warning to show his new clients and his entourage his finished work.
The article describes the friendship and then the bitter falling-out of Neutra and Schindler, five years Neutra’s senior. They were acquaintances…

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“Vanishing Act” by Alex Ross is a concise history, with house photographs, of the Austrian-born architect Richard Neutra, the pioneer of the Southern California modern architecture in the 1930s. The article appears in the September 27, 2021 issue of The New Yorker.
Neutra’s benchmark was floor-to-ceiling windows and mirrored sliding doors to dissolve boundary between the abundant greenery of Los Angeles and the interior of the house. Like Frank Loyd Wright, he favored flat roofs and minimalist exteriors He sited most of his houses where the residents could enjoy a glorious view.
The architect, as a man, was far different than his calm architecture. He’s been described as pompous and overbearing, barging into his clients’ houses without warning to show his new clients and his entourage his finished work.
The article describes the friendship and then the bitter falling-out of Neutra and Schindler, five years Neutra’s senior. They were acquaintances in architecture school in Austria, but Schindler got out of Europe just before World War I. Neutra wasn’t so fortunate; serving four years in the Austro-Hungarian Army. Schindler welcomed Neutra when he finally arrived in California with his wife. From there, their relationship went downhill.
I leave you to read the rest of the article about their tragic falling-out.
Neutra worked on what are today considered luxury houses, but he also designed and built public buildings. He worked on, but failed to bring about, an affordable housing complex in Los Angeles for low-income people. “A slum,” he called the project.
The article relates the stories of people who have commissioned and/or lived in Neutra houses. One woman, who is now a hundred-and-two years old, attributes her longevity to the beauty and calmness of her Neutra house.
Recommended for all architecture buffs, anyone interested in the history of Los Angeles, and anyone interested in a creative person’s life.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

“Mistress of the macabre” in the October 15, 2021 TLS https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/letters-of-shirley-jackson-book-review-lucy-scholes/
This is a review of the collected letters, all 640 pages of them, by Shirley Jackson, edited by one of her children, Laurence Jackson Hyman. But the review also delves in depth of Ruth Franklin’s 2016 biography, “Shirley Jackson: a rather haunted life.” The biography, apparently, is more illuminating of the writer’s life than her own letters.
In gothic fiction, Shirley Jackson is best known for her story, “The Lottery,” and her novels “The Haunting of Hill House” and “We Have Always Lived in the Castle.” But she had bestsellers of her two humorous memoirs of motherhood and domesticity in “Life Among the Savages” and “Raising Demons.” She earned $110,000-plus a year in the 1950s from the latter books.
“The Lottery” was first published in The New Yorker in 1948 and resulted in a deluge of letters to the magazine from outraged and offended readers. I’ll leave you to find the story for yourself, but it involves a small, picture-perfect New England town. No plot spoilers, here!
Jackson lived in a seventeen-room mansion in Bennington, Vermont with her four children, her husband Stanley Hyman, a literary critic and staff writer for The New Yorker, cats, and 25,000 books.
The collected letters don’t reveal, but Franklin’s biography does—what kind of life Jackson actually led.
Jackson’s mother constantly fat-shamed her and criticized her appearance (yes, Shirley was obese and had unruly hair). Her mother never mentioned her critically-acclaimed and successful writing.
Jackson’s husband constantly bullied her, was a serial womanizer (yes, Bennington is also the location of the all-women’s college at which Hyman apparently roamed), bragged about his exploits to his wife, and didn’t help at all with the household chores.
Leaving Jackson to raise the four children, go grocery shopping, cook all the meals and clean up, do the laundry, and clean the house. Hyman complained, between affairs, that Jackson didn’t do enough of her money-making writing. That was his only mention of her writing.
I wanted to pull Jackson aside and say, “Cut off your bitch of a mother, divorce your bastard of husband.” But she didn’t. She stayed loyal to those lifelong abusers, drinking bottle after bottle of whiskey, sometimes in one afternoon, “a lonely, belittled woman”.
Jackson died in 1965, at age 48, of “heart failure”.
At the end of the review, I was misty-eyed. Whispered a little prayer, “Shirley, we admire and honor your hard-won writing to this day. Rest in Peace.” I hope she heard me.
Do you read biographies? These days, I seldom do, but I used to. I DO read the reviews of biographies published in the TLS.
So there you have it, my friends.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Summer of Love
is back in the U.S., U.K.,  France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, BarnesandNoble, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

8.30.16.LISA.MASON.MED

I’m honored and thrilled that “Arachne” will appear in The Big Book of Cyberpunk to be published in 2023 by Vintage, an imprint of Penguin Random House.
“Arachne” is my first story, which was published by Omni Magazine.
London-based editor, Jared Shurin, of The Big Book anthology said of “Arachne”, “The legal/corporate world it describes, the way you bring the ‘cyberspace’ to life, and, most importantly, the way it draws deep, mythic connections from our relationship with technology – it is truly phenomenal, and, 40 years on, still incredibly relevant.”
Vancouver-based critic, Steve Fahnestalk, said in his Amazing Stories.com review of ODDITIES: 22 Stories, ““Arachne, Lisa’s first story, in Omni magazine (December 1987), is sort of more up-to-date today—what with telepresence and social distancing—than maybe it was in 1987. It’s kind of nice to find a 33-year-old techno story that hasn’t dated!”
Photo of me by Peggy Park. Black widow earrings and black-and-red necklace by Tom Robinson.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Tom was working in his sculpture studio, listening to the radio. (I have to have silence when I write or draw.) The Simon and Garfunkle tune came on, “Feelin’ Groovy”.
Tom began mocking the lyrics, “Lookin’ for drugs and feelin’ groovy.” I objected, “That’s a sweet song.”
Simon and Garfunkle are, of course, from New York City.
Tom said, “When I first came up to San Francisco from Los Angeles in the late Sixties, I was in the Caffe Trieste (the name is spelled with two f’s), I said something was ‘groovy’.” Someone at the table corrected me. “Are you from L.A.?” she asked. I allowed that I was. “Up here, we don’t say ‘groovy’, which is slang from the music industry. Up here in San Francisco, we say, ‘Far out.’” She added, “And don’t call it ‘Frisco’.”
Tom told me surfer slang from L.A. was also “bitchin’” which meant groovy or far out. I’d never heard of ‘bitchin’ in Cleveland.
The same woman corrected Tom when he said, “Hip.” She said, “It’s pronounced ‘hep’.”
Which is just silly, I think.
Of course, “cool” has been around fifty years or more. Just don’t say ‘cool’ every other word, please (which I’ve overheard.).
So there you have it, my friends.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in print at Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, and in Japanese print. New! Now in Print in Australia
The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Tom and I like to have variety on our movie weekend. We only view movies once a month. We’re busy writing new material and creating sculpture and art on other days of the month. Tom found all of these films at our lovely local library (for free, due back in three weeks).
First off,
Sabrina” with a very cute, smiley-face Audrey Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart, William Holden. A 1954 romantic comedy we’d never seen (it’s before my time, but I never saw the film on late-night TV or on campus in film festivals), it’s a Cinderella tale (much like “Pretty Woman” with a wealthy industrialist falling in love with a prostitute). Hepburn plays the daughter of the chauffeur employed by a stupendously wealthy family on Long Island who attracts the interest of two brothers in the family, an accomplished workaholic who runs the family businesses, Linus (Bogart) and a rakish playboy, David (Holden).
I usually wouldn’t be interested in the story, but the film is written by Billy Wilder with Samuel Taylor and Ernest Lehman, from a play by Samuel Taylor, and directed and produced by Billy Wilder (he of the inspired, hilarious “Some Like It Hot”) Wilder keeps the humor, wit, and action going nonstop but also has trenchant observations about the rich and the poor. (Sabrina’s disapproving chauffeur father, who drives Linus to New York City in a classic Rolls Royce, likes to say, “There’s a front seat and a back seat and a window in between.”
There are some story gaps that bothered me but I won’t go into them–I don’t give away any plot spoilers. Overall, the film follows the classic romantic comedy plot, with twists and turns and a downturn will-they-won’t-they at the end resolved in the very last scene. Rom-com screenwriters might like to study this film. Recommended for all viewers but especially romance-comedy fans.
By the way, the rich family owns eight classic cars, including the Rolls, and rakish David has his own sleek convertible sports car. We couldn’t identify the car and Tom got out his classic car book. There it was, newly released by Chevrolet in 1953—a Corvette.
Next, two noir crime films:
“The Asphalt Jungle” (great title) directed by John Huston in 1950 and starring, among others, Sam Jaffe as Doc (he played the Einstein-like physicist in “The Day The Earth Stood Still”) and Marilyn Monroe in her first speaking part as the mistress of a wealthy criminal lawyer Emmerich who says, “Crime is only a left-handed form of human endeavor.” Huston also co-wrote the screenplay, from a novel by W.R. Burnett. A newly released mastermind, Doc, plans a spectacular jewel heist, knowing that if he fails, he’ll go back to prison for life. Huston broke new ground by portraying the criminals involved in the heist sympathetically and the viewer roots for them to get away with it. A lot of smoking and drinking. Recommended for fans of noir crime films.
“A Frightened City” is a British film featuring Sean Connery’s first appearance that reputedly got him the part of James Bond. He’s very Bond-like in this film (womanizing, an expert in judo, he even climbs up a drain pipe as he did in (I believe) “Thunderball”) except that here he’s on the wrong side of the law. He’s a Mob enforcer in London, 1961 (who knew Sixties London had so many mobsters?). A ruthless accountant organizes the major racketeers in town into a syndicate. But the arrangement doesn’t work out (to say the least). Filmed in cooperation with Scotland Yard. A lot of smoking and drinking. Recommended for fans of noir crime films.
Next we come to the foreign fantasy crime film:
Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame”, billed as “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” meets “Sherlock Holmes.”  The film is in Chinese with subtitles but the subtitles are so clear, concise, and readable, the viewer can absorb them in a second and turn her eyes back to the action on the screen. (Chinese is a pretty-sounding language much like French and unlike Japanese and German which sound harsh and militaristic)
The action is colorful, imaginative, and action-packed (people fly through the air, undertaking martial arts), inspired by the true story of the one of the Tang Dynasty’s most celebrated officials. Empress-to-be Wu Zetian has commissioned a towering statue of the Buddha before the Imperial Palace to commemorate her coronation as the first female ruler of China. But architects and builders mysteriously spontaneously combust and burn to death.  Wu summons Dee from prison and appoints him in charge of the investigation.
The characters are nuanced and sympathetic. Even the Empress-to-be (whose favorite saying is, “When you get into power, everyone is expendable”) is a sympathetic character. Two dynamic characters have mixed motivations and intentions but we were sad when they got killed. Recommended for fans of an exotic, fantasy crime story who don’t mind subtitles.
And two films about British artists whom Tom was familiar with but I was not.
“A Harlot’s Progress” is a British film with the same title as William Hogarth’s famous series of narrative paintings (much like today’s graphic novels) featuring the seedy and brutal underworld of a young prostitute in 1730 London. The film states at the end that Hogarth never said whether the prostitute was a real person but the film suggests that he was intimately involved with her life.
The camera “enters” Hogarth’s paintings into real life, a technique I’ve seen before, but particularly effective here.
The film starts with a scene of a child lying dead in the street and the statement, “One out of 20 people died of starvation in 1730 London.”  Hogarth was deeply sympathetic toward the poor (two pedestrians step right over the dead child) and especially sympathetic toward poor girls who were forced into prostitution.
Hogarth was a talented painter and a skilled engraver. He made engravings of “A Harlot’s Progress,” which were financially successful due to the condemnation of brothels by government and church officials. But Hogarth was making a wry statement of society’s conditions that engendered brothels. He founded an orphanage for abandoned children of prostitutes.
Make no mistake, this is a brutal film with depictions of violence toward women but an astute depiction of one artist’s life and a moving tribute to William Hogarth’s work and aspirations. Recommended for those interested in artists and only those with a strong stomach.
“Mr. Turner” a British film by Mike Leigh, director of the excellent film, “Topsy Turvy”. The story is a little slow and not as compelling as “Harlot”, covering the last twenty-five years in Joseph Mallord William Turner’s life, but shows his evolution as one of the most beloved painters in Britain a little after Hogarth’s time. He worked in oils and watercolors and painted seascapes, ships at sea, locomotives, and historical subjects, finally experimenting with painting “light”. Queen Victoria hated his light paintings; he overhears at an exhibition her exclaiming over “that ugly yellow.” But his light paintings were a later inspiration for the Impressionists, especially Monet and Pissarro.
Once again, a fascinating look at an artist’s life in the late 1700s, from him shopping Winsor and Newton’s new shop for chrome yellow pigment to sailors tying him with rope to the high mast of a ship during a storm so he could get a good look at the sea.
Recommended for those viewers interested in artists.
So there you have it, my friends.
My second collection, ODDITIES: 22 Stories, is on Kindle worldwide including in the US, in the UK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in the Netherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US, in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! in
Australia
CHROME is in U.S. print as a beautiful trade paperback. Also in U.K. print, in German print, in French print, in Spanish print, in Italian print, in Japanese print
and NEW! in Australia.. The ebook is on US Kindle, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, Apple, Kobo, and on UK Kindle, Canada Kindle, Australia Kindle, India Kindle, Germany Kindle, France Kindle, Spain Kindle, Italy Kindle, Netherlands Kindle, Japan Kindle, Brazil Kindle, and Mexico Kindle.
Find the Print book of SUMMER OF LOVE in the U.S., U.K.,  France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, and New in Print in Australia The ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute pet pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!

Updated for 2021! Published in print in eight countries and as an ebook on eighteen markets worldwide.
As I mulled over my published short fiction (now forty stories) for my first collection, I found seven wildly different stories with one thing in common–a heroine totally unlike me. I’m the girl next door. I have no idea where these strange ladies came from.
In The Oniomancer (Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine), a Chinese-American punk bicycle messenger finds an artifact on the street. In Guardian (Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine), an African-American gallerist resorts to voodoo to confront a criminal. In Felicitas (Desire Burn: Women Writing from the Dark Side of Passion [Carroll and Graf]), an immigrant faces life as a cat shapeshifter. In Stripper (Unique Magazine), an exotic dancer battles the Mob. In Triad (Universe 2 [Bantam]), Dana Anad lives half the time as a woman, half the time as a man, and falls in love with a very strange lady. In Destination (Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction), a driver takes three strangers from a ride board on a cross-country trip as the radio reports that a serial killer is on the loose. In Transformation and the Postmodern Identity Crisis (Fantastic Alice [Ace]), Alice considers life after Wonderland.
Five stars on Facebook and Amazon! “Great work, Lisa Mason!”
“Hilarious, provocative, profound.”
From Jeanne-Mary Allen, Author on Facebook and the Book Brothers Blog: “Kyle Wylde and I are thrilled to have found such a talented, dedicated, and brilliant collection of shorts in Strange Ladies: 7 Stories…Your style/craft is highly impressive.”
From the San Francisco Book Review: “Strange Ladies: 7 Stories offers everything you could possibly want, from more traditional science fiction and fantasy tropes to thought-provoking explorations of gender issues and pleasing postmodern humor…This is a must-read collection.” http://anotheruniverse.com/strange-ladies-7-stories/
From the Book Brothers Review Blog: “Lisa Mason might just be the female Philip K. Dick. Like Dick, Mason’s stories are far more than just sci-fi tales, they are brimming with insight into human consciousness and the social condition….Strange Ladies: 7 Storiesis a sci-fi collection of excellent quality. If you like deeply crafted worlds with strange, yet relatable characters, then you won’t want to miss it.” http://www.thebookbrothers.com/2013/09/the-book-brothers-review-strange.html#more
And on Amazon: 5.0 out of 5 stars This one falls in the must-read category, an appellation that I rarely use.
“I have been a fan of Lisa Mason from the beginning of her writing career, but I confess that I often overlook her short fiction. That turns out to have been a big mistake! I have just read Strange Ladies thinking I would revisit a few old friends and discover a few I had missed. Well, I had missed more than I had thought, and I regret that oversight. This collection was so much fun! I loved each and every story and enjoyed their unique twists, turns, and insights. I thank Ms Mason especially, though, for the high note ending with the big smiles in Transformation and the Postmodern Identity Crisis. Uh oh, I guess I still am a child of the summer of love. Well played. You made me laugh at the world and myself.”
“I’m quite impressed, not only by the writing, which gleams and sparkles, but also by [Lisa Mason’s] versatility . . . Mason is a wordsmith . . . her modern take on Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland is a hilarious gem! [This collection] sparkles, whirls, and fizzes. Mason is clearly a writer to follow!”—Amazing Stories
5.0 out of 5 stars Great collection that will make you think
Format: Kindle Edition
“My definition of a good short story is one that you keep thinking about for days, and this book had several of them.”
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories (“A must-read collection—The San Francisco Review of Books). On Nook, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo.
On Kindle at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands.
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is in Print in the U.S., in the U.K., in Germany, in France, in Spain, in Italy, and in Japan. New! Now in
Australia.New! My second collection ODDITIES: 22 Stories in print and an ebook.Visit me at www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, and screenplays, worldwide links, beautiful covers, reviews, interviews, blogs, round-tables, adorable cat pictures, forthcoming works, fine art and bespoke jewelry by my husband Tom Robinson, and more!

10.18.17.TGOA.BOOKS

5.0 out of 5 stars fast-paced occult/ suspense/ mystery murder story well worth reading
THE GARDEN OF ABRACADABRA from Lisa Mason, author of the wondrous scifi time travel book, Summer of Love, which, despite being fiction, may be one of the most accurate histories written about San Francisco, and the Haight/Asbury hippie scene.
Ms Mason does it again, weaving history into a fantasy/ occult yarn. Once upon a time in the 60’s, the late Issac Bonewits went to UC Berkeley, in Berkeley CA, just across the bay from San Francisco. He talked Berkeley into letting him major in Magick, not stage magic but ritual Magick! He got an independent study degree, the first and last BA in Magick. True story! (Since then Berkeley has tightened up topics for independent study) After his degree, Bonewits became a wizard of sorts and wrote many books including one entitled “Real Magic”, about his ideas, studies and adventures.
In the last century, English dark occultist Aleister Crowley also performed a great deal of ritual Magick, and destroyed the hierarchy of the Hermetic Order of Golden Dawn, the most famous English occult order, from which we get the most popular Coleman tarot deck, Eden Gray, and many occult books. Crowley wrote “Book of the Law”, “Book of Lies”, “Magick in Theory and Practice” etc. Crowley regularly sponsored sex and drug orgies among his followers and fancied himself a “Laird”, Scottish royalty, despite no evidence.
Ms Mason’s book contains fictionalized characters based on the real Bonewits and Crowley. The heroine is Abby Teller, another fledgling occultist with budding powers. Thrown into this mix of occultists is an FBI guy Jack Kovac, an agent assigned to hunt down occultist criminals. He investigates murders with occult overtones. Abby enrolls in college at a fictionalized UC Berkeley to study Magick. She also gets finagled into managing an apartment full of vampires, and other occultists, including the rich sinister Aleister Crowley character named “Prince Laster”. The top floor penthouse of her apartment, she discovers, is linked up with a portal to another dimension. Abby has a relationship with a bad-news seedy old boyfriend, Dan Stern, also a dark side occultist. She goes to UC Berkeley Magick Dept “Professor Bonwitch” to get advice how to deal with these various demonic weirdoes, including the vampires, (who come across to me like San Francisco’s hyper aggressive panhandlers.)
Ms Mason has written a heady mixture, highly entertaining. A fast-paced occult/ suspense/ mystery murder story well worth reading! Abby Teller wears high heels and pantyhose which not only make her legs look pretty but also will prevent an evil spell from getting “inside” her lower chakra. Who knew? Despite some poor decisions, Abby Teller seems more charmingly feminine than many of today’s fictional crop of macho tomboys.
And what is Abracadabra other than a place name? A spell repeated, leaving off a letter at a time. At the end, Abracadabra is supposed to make a demon diminish and ultimately vanish.
More Lisa Mason books with Abby Teller are promised I’m looking forward to the next.”
So there you have it, my friends.
Find The Garden of Abracadabra (“Fun and enjoyable urban fantasy . . . I want to read more!) On BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands. NOW IN PRINT! Find the beautiful trade paperback at in the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, Italy, and Japan. New! Now in Print in Australia at Australia
Find the Print book of SUMMER OF LOVE (a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist) in the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, and New in Print inAustralia The ebook is on US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands
The Gilded Age (a New York Times Notable Book and New York Public Library Recommended Book). On BarnesandNoble, US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Apple, Kobo, and Smashwords. On Kindle worldwide in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands. BACK IN PRINT! Find the beautiful trade paperback at in the U.S., the U.K., in France, in Germany, in Italy, in Spain, and in Japan. New! Now in print in Australia.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is on Kindle worldwide, including in the US
, in theUK, Canada, Australia, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, in theNetherlands, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Japan.
ODDITIES: 22 Stories is in Print as a beautiful trade paperback in the US
, inUK, Canada, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Japan. New! Now in Print in Australia
Strange Ladies: 7 Stories (“A must-read collection—The San Francisco Review of Books). On Nook, Smashwords, Apple, and Kobo. On Kindle at US Kindle, Canada Kindle, UK Kindle, Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Brazil, Japan, India, Mexico, and Netherlands. Strange Ladies: 7 Stories is in Print in the U.S., in the U.K., in Germany, in France, in Spain, in Italy, and in Japan. New! Now in Print in Australia at Australia
Visit me at http://www.lisamason.com for all my books, ebooks, stories, interviews, round tables, cute cat pictures, the bespoke artwork and studio jewelry of Tom Robinson, forthcoming works, and more!